Thomist


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Tho·mism

 (tō′mĭz′əm)
n.
The theological and philosophical system of Saint Thomas Aquinas, a system that dominated scholasticism.

Tho′mist n.
Tho·mis′tic adj.
Translations

Thomist

[ˈtɒmɪst]
A. ADJtomista
B. Ntomista mf

Thomist

nThomist(in) m(f)
adjthomistisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Some sections may appeal esoterically only to Thomist philosophers (e.g., discussions about Christian philosophy, birth control, Maritain's relation to Lamennais); some dates are incorrect or inconsistent (e.g.
There will never be another Thomist quite like him.
Excellent contributions from Thomist Craig Boyd on natural law and from Aristotelian Larry Arnhardt on Darwinian moral sense and natural right give this volume a distinctive cast.
Martin Luther (1483-1546), who was not a Thomist, caused a death-blow to philosophy among his followers because he taught that human reason is so wounded by original sin that it is helpless in the search for ultimate truth.
Gilson, in his Thomist Realism and the Critique of Knowledge, maintains that the existing man, the individual person, not the intellect or senses, grasps the existence (esse) of anything.
in the moral philosophy of the contemporary Thomist, Alasdair Mac-Intyre.
Although Jesuits were officially bound to uphold Aristotelian and Thomist theses in philosophy and theology, they discreetly supported the new methods and created a culture that helped them to flourish: "We now know that Jesuit practitioners were instrumental in elevating the status of mathematics over that of philosophy, that they made early and important contributions to the mathematization of physics, and that they were pivotal to the development of experimental science.
The Problem of Realism in the Philosophy of Charles Taylor and an Existential Thomist Proposal, HUGH WILLIAMS
At least at this point in his career, Balthasar, along with the other nouveaux theologiens recently clustered at Lyon-Fourviere, found Marechal to be a breath of flesh Thomist air, able to dialogue with the philosophy of modernity, while preserving both metaphysical realism and the natural/supernatural coinherence of the tradition.
Keenan, "Distinguishing Charity as Goodness and Prudence as Rightness: A Key to Thomas's Secunda Pars," Thomist 56 (1992) 407-26; James F.
A synthesis of several Thomistic schools, Louis-Marie de Blignieres' first published monograph in philosophy, with preface by the editor of Revue Thomiste, hands on the metaphysics of that most penetrating, but also impenetrable Thomist of the last century, M.
(1) Putnam's objection to the Thomist is prompted by his longstanding worries about how language or the mind "hooks onto the world." (2) He has argued that no system of representations, mental or linguistic, could have an intrinsic relationship to the world.