Thomist


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Tho·mism

 (tō′mĭz′əm)
n.
The theological and philosophical system of Saint Thomas Aquinas, a system that dominated scholasticism.

Tho′mist n.
Tho·mis′tic adj.
Translations

Thomist

[ˈtɒmɪst]
A. ADJtomista
B. Ntomista mf

Thomist

nThomist(in) m(f)
adjthomistisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Together, Romanus Cessario and Cajetan Cuddy also outline the history of the Thomist tradition from the medieval era through revival in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
His books include studies such as Gregory Corso: Doubting Thomist (Southern Illinois University Press, 2001) and the novel Temping, an account of a conversion experience (Black Heron Press, 2006).
Flor's essay extends Anthony Cronin's foundational reading of O'Brien as Thomist, but more in the spirit of deformation than of redemptive possibility.
She argues that Suarez's position was in many respects already far from common Thomist tradition.
In the Thomist manner, it is conceded that Aristotelianism is not sacrosanct; after all, Aristotle believed in the eternity of the world and the mortality of the soul.
In 1972, he finished a dissertation that brought the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead into conversation with the Thomist tradition.
Such Thomist philosophy is of course metaphysically complex, but attempting to put it in a simplistic way, a 5-year-old kindergartner knows nothing but the joy of life and the innocence of discovery: He is filled with good.
These allusions are scattered and fragmentary, and most are owed to the Thomist perspective that McLuhan regularly integrated into his version of New Criticism, but apart from that, it is still clear that McLuhan regularly reviewed from a Catholic/Christian worldview as he brought his faith perspective to the printed page.
In the Netherlands, this Christian duty was embraced by three prominent Christian social-thought movements, namely, the sovereignty, the Thomist, and the neo-Calvinist movements (see fig.
And yet, the questions it answers were never satisfactorily resolved and merit our attention now; furthermore, O'Reilly's inspiration by recent Continental thought (Gadamer, chiefly), and his use of the main resources of the new Thomist thought that has emerged since Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue (1980), makes his study something that should have been written decades ago but probably could not have been, simply because approaches to his subject--Thomas Aquinas and Beauty--were inadequately conscious of the full complexity of Aquinas' thought.
The neo- Thomist made plausible for the poet-critic the moderate realist metaphysics of Scholastic philosophy with which Eliot had become familiar in the years immediately following his abandonment of his dissertation on the British Hegelian philosopher, F.
The Thomist scholar and prolific author had been diagnosed with esophageal cancer, and would have turned 81 on Feb.