Thrace

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Thrace

 (thrās)
A region and ancient country of the southeast Balkan Peninsula north of the Aegean Sea. In ancient times it extended as far north as the Danube River. The region was colonized by Greeks in the sixth century bc and later passed under the control of Rome, Byzantium, and Ottoman Turkey. In the 19th and 20th centuries, much of the region passed to Bulgaria and Greece.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Thrace

(θreɪs)
n
1. (Placename) an ancient country in the E Balkan Peninsula: successively under the Persians, Macedonians, and Romans
2. (Placename) a region of SE Europe, corresponding to the S part of the ancient country: divided by the Maritsa River into Western Thrace (Greece) and Eastern Thrace (Turkey)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Thrace

(θreɪs)

n.
1. an ancient region of varying extent in the E part of the Balkan Peninsula: later a Roman province; now in Bulgaria, Turkey, and Greece.
2. a modern region corresponding to the S part of the Roman province: now divided between Greece (Western Thrace) and Turkey (Eastern Thrace).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thrace - an ancient country and wine producing region in the east of the Balkan Peninsula to the north of the Aegean SeaThrace - an ancient country and wine producing region in the east of the Balkan Peninsula to the north of the Aegean Sea; colonized by ancient Greeks; later a Roman province; now divided between Bulgaria and Greece and Turkey
battle of Lule Burgas, Lule Burgas - the principal battle of the Balkan Wars (1912); Bulgarian forces defeated the Turks
Balkan Peninsula, Balkans - a large peninsula in southeastern Europe containing the Balkan Mountain Range
Thracian - an inhabitant of ancient Thrace
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2018, it became clear that Odelo will open a production base in Plovdiv as part of the Thracia Economic Zone, which will make stops for Mercedes.
Currently I'm reading 'Border: A journey to the edge of Europe' by Kapka Kassabova which explores the complex border history of Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey centred on the ancient kingdom of Thracia. During the Cold War the Bulgarian - Turkish border was a favoured escape route for young East Germans wanting to reach the West.
In today's political map, the Balkan Geography includes Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia, parts of Slovenia and Romania, and the Thracia region of Turkey.
According to ancient Greek writings, Dionysos, the God of wine & grape harvests was born on the fertile lands of Thracia, Dacia-Getae (Romania) being in the heart of it.
Ball, "Morphology and postlarval development of the ligament of Thracia phaseolina (bivalvia: Thraciidae), with a discussion of model choice in allometric studies," Journal of Molluscan Studies, vol.
(1.) Jacobo Castaldo, Romaniae que olim Thracia dicta, 1584.
"Shifting the priority to using local sources in power generation has attracted foreign investors to coal fields in Konya, Eskisehir, Elbistan and Thracia.", Turkish Miners Association's (TMD) head Mustafa Sonmez commented on the investor reaction to the revamped incentives.
Classical writers such as Pliny, Plutarch, Herodotus, and Solinus had very different names for locations in and around this region: references to Dacia, for example, or to Scythia, Dalmatia, Pannonia, Thracia, and Illyria in early modern drama all derive from names in the ancient texts.
Taylor (1973) considered that the spikes in Thracia might be vestigial remains of an outer prismatic shell layer; that is, they could be considered part of the main shell valve.