thrave

Related to thrave: provided

thrave

(θreɪv)
n
(Units) dialect Scot and Northern English twenty-four sheaves of corn
[Old English threfe, of Scandinavian origin]

Thrave

 a bundle or handful; a herd or drove; a number of two dozen—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: thrave of ballads, 1825; of barley (24 sheaves), 1812; of corn (24 sheaves), 1423; of flax, 1462; of gallants, 1610; of heather, 1716; of hemp, 1618; of Jews, 1656; of oats (24 sheaves), 1812; of peas (24 sheaves), 1812; of rye, 1551; of thrushes, 1486; of wheat (28 sheaves), 1551.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Elwazir (back right, blue and white cap) finishing second to Thrave (left) on his first career start in the Derrinstown British EBF Maiden Stakes at Newmarket last September ALAN CROWHURST
Not cheap at 500,000 guineas, he at least showed on debut that he possessed an engine when finishing second to Henry Candy's smart prospect Thrave.
After all, though the Scots language is likely to die in Ulster if subject to separate development in the manner seen hitherto, in Scotland the loss of 'a daimen icker in a thrave' would see it only slightly diminished.
The idea belongs to branch committee member, Tony Thraves, who is ex forces and wife Lorraine, ex police.
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Mauricio Soto (1) * and Christopher Thraves Caro (2) ([dagger])
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Alac Thraves, vice president of the city's Trades Council and Social Party member, was one of the organisers of the counter-protest.