thresher

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Related to Thresher sharks: Alopiidae

thresh·er

 (thrĕsh′ər)
n.
1. One who threshes.
2. A threshing machine.
3. A thresher shark.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thresher

(ˈθrɛʃə)
n
1. (Agriculture) a person who threshes
2. (Agriculture) short for threshing machine
3. (Animals) Also called: thrasher or thresher shark any of various large sharks of the genus Alopias, esp A. vulpinus, occurring in tropical and temperate seas: family Alopiidae. They have a very long whiplike tail with which they are thought to round up the small fish on which they feed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

thresh•er

(ˈθrɛʃ ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that threshes.
2. a large shark of the genus Alopias, esp. A. vulpinus, which herds small fish by flailing its tail.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thresher - a farm machine for separating seeds or grain from the husks and strawthresher - a farm machine for separating seeds or grain from the husks and straw
farm machine - a machine used in farming
2.thresher - large pelagic shark of warm seas with a whiplike tail used to round up small fish on which to feedthresher - large pelagic shark of warm seas with a whiplike tail used to round up small fish on which to feed
shark - any of numerous elongate mostly marine carnivorous fishes with heterocercal caudal fins and tough skin covered with small toothlike scales
Alopius, genus Alopius - type genus of the family Alopiidae; in some classifications considered a genus of the family Lamnidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

thresher

[ˈθreʃəʳ] N (= person) → trillador(a) m/f; (= machine) → trilladora f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

thresher

n
(Agr: = machine) → Dreschmaschine f; (= person)Drescher(in) m(f)
(= thresher shark)Drescherhai m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Malapascua in Northern Cebu is famed for its pelagic thresher sharks, which resemble graceful wraiths gliding in and out of the blue.
Moalboal itself has been a known scuba diving destination for many years, primarily due to the small, offshore pinnacle called Pescador Island-known for its steep walls, crystal visibility, schools of shimmering sardines and the occasional thresher sharks or whale sharks that cruise the calm waters between Cebu and Negros.
Bigger animals also get into the picture with eagle rays, devil rays, manta rays and sharks, including thresher sharks and hammerhead sharks.'
A huge Orca was seen in the water in Torquay this morning - just a few days after leaping Thresher Sharks and another Orca - commonly known as a Killer Whale - were spotted.
Thresher sharks are found in all temperate and tropical oceans of the world and are usually solitary creatures who keep themselves to themselves and can be seen jumping out of the water like a dolphin.
Other marketable species, including mako sharks and bigeye thresher sharks, comprised an additional 11% of the catch, resulting in a total marketable catch rate of ~20%.
(http://www.foxnews.com/world/2018/01/24/300-dead-sharks-found-by-mexico-roadside-150-miles-from-sea.html) Fox News  reported the office of environmental protection said Wednesday some of the sharks found on the highway were thresher sharks, which were illegally fished in the northern states of Sonora and Sinaloa. Reports also stated thresher sharks are not a protected species in Mexico. 
Thresher sharks, which is the species in question, can go some way to retaining their metabolic heat, enabling them to survive in colder water for longer than many other shark species.
Insights into catch-and-release survivorship and stress-induced blood biochemistry of common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus) captured in the southern California recreational fishery.
On the bottom the swordfish baits often get eaten by a host of sharks like the mako, hammerhead and thresher sharks.