thresher

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Related to Thresher sharks: Alopiidae

thresh·er

 (thrĕsh′ər)
n.
1. One who threshes.
2. A threshing machine.
3. A thresher shark.

thresher

(ˈθrɛʃə)
n
1. (Agriculture) a person who threshes
2. (Agriculture) short for threshing machine
3. (Animals) Also called: thrasher or thresher shark any of various large sharks of the genus Alopias, esp A. vulpinus, occurring in tropical and temperate seas: family Alopiidae. They have a very long whiplike tail with which they are thought to round up the small fish on which they feed

thresh•er

(ˈθrɛʃ ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that threshes.
2. a large shark of the genus Alopias, esp. A. vulpinus, which herds small fish by flailing its tail.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thresher - a farm machine for separating seeds or grain from the husks and strawthresher - a farm machine for separating seeds or grain from the husks and straw
farm machine - a machine used in farming
2.thresher - large pelagic shark of warm seas with a whiplike tail used to round up small fish on which to feedthresher - large pelagic shark of warm seas with a whiplike tail used to round up small fish on which to feed
shark - any of numerous elongate mostly marine carnivorous fishes with heterocercal caudal fins and tough skin covered with small toothlike scales
Alopius, genus Alopius - type genus of the family Alopiidae; in some classifications considered a genus of the family Lamnidae
Translations

thresher

[ˈθreʃəʳ] N (= person) → trillador(a) m/f; (= machine) → trilladora f

thresher

n
(Agr: = machine) → Dreschmaschine f; (= person)Drescher(in) m(f)
(= thresher shark)Drescherhai m
References in periodicals archive ?
amp;nbsp;Reports also stated thresher sharks are not a protected species in Mexico.
The report also pointed out the case of thresher sharks washing up on the beach shores of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
Thresher sharks, which is the species in question, can go some way to retaining their metabolic heat, enabling them to survive in colder water for longer than many other shark species.
On the bottom the swordfish baits often get eaten by a host of sharks like the mako, hammerhead and thresher sharks.
2013) in " PLOS One," bears the title "Thresher sharks use tail-slaps as a hunting strategy," and concludes "The evidence is now clear; thresher sharks really hunt with their tails.
Meanwhile, Arnel Yaptinchay, director of Marine Wildlife Watch of the Philippines, cited the socio-economic benefits of protecting sharks especially with shark tourism like in the Philippines with sites like Donsol in Sorgoson which is known for whale sharks, Tubbataha reef for reef sharks, and Monad shoal for thresher sharks.
The conference also imposed strict regulations on the trade in silky and thresher sharks and devil rays, allowing trade only with special permits and calling for monitoring measures to be put in place.
Also on Monday, Cites members voted to include the silky shark, three species of thresher sharks and nine species of devil rays in its "Appendix II" listing, which strictly controls trade so that species are not overharvested or threatened.
Gethyn has encountered many a shark during fishing trips off Holyhead, including thresher sharks.
Graham Pullen, a veteran fisherman and presenter of the online Totally Awesome Fishing Show, said: "This huge influx of mackerel is sure to draw in the sharks - blue sharks, thresher sharks and the porbeagle shark all eat mackerel.
Thresher sharks are usually solitary creatures who keep themselves to themselves, and can be seen jumping out of the water like a dolphin.