throat singing


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Related to throat singing: Tuvan throat singing

throat singing

n.
A form of singing in which a single voice produces more than one tone at the same time, usually as harmonics of a main tone or drone, traditionally practiced by peoples in central Asia, the Inuit, and Tibetan Buddhist monks. Also called overtone singing.

throat singer n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As a tribute to Inuit traditions, it included throat singing, drumming and traditional dancing.
Brilliant vocal data, ancient technique of throat singing left no one indifferent, and numerous spectators applauded Nazgul and her team for a long time.
THE DUCHESS OF CORNWALL IT'S a Duchess double after Camilla had us in stitches when she was unable to hide her giggles during a display of traditional Inuit throat singing during her and Charles' recent tour of Canada.
Throughout the film, throat singing by Iviok punctuates the powerful statements made by LGBTQ community members, political and community leaders, families of trans youth and even the makers of a film about a traditional Inuit lesbian relationship.
Changing Times, a 10-episode documentary that offers a glimpse into the unique lives and dreams of the Chinese people preserving China's cultural heritage -- from Kunqu opera, "Old Tune" music to throat singing and Bokh wrestling, a type of grappling martial arts practised in Inner Mongolia.
It's noteworthy that the first runner-up, the Mongolian group Khusugtun, performed the ancient art of throat singing complete with traditional instruments and costumes.
One of the judges praised Penumbra's and Mongolia's Khusugtun band of throat singing for making her work a noble task.
Throat singing (khoomii) is one of the prominent genres in areas in the south of Russia such as Tuva, and it is particularly common in western Mongolia.
This year, the artists of throat singing and those playing on ethnic instruments will perform on stage," she said.
DECLARING old timey banjo music "too modern" Leo Romero switches to Mongolian Tuvan Throat Singing.
Along with percussionist Jean Martin and cellist Cris Derkesen, Tagaq's throat singing added emotion to the backdrop of the 1922 film Nanook of the North, a silent film that portrays images of life in an early 20th century Inuit community in Northern Quebec.