thrombosis

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throm·bo·sis

 (thrŏm-bō′sĭs)
n. pl. throm·bo·ses (-sēz)
The formation, presence, or development of a thrombus.

[New Latin thrombōsis, from Greek, a clotting, from thrombousthai, to clot, from thrombos, clot.]

thrombosis

(θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (siːz)
1. (Pathology) the formation or presence of a thrombus
2. (Pathology) informal short for coronary thrombosis
[C18: from New Latin, from Greek: curdling, from thrombousthai to clot, from thrombos thrombus]
thrombotic adj

throm•bo•sis

(θrɒmˈboʊ sɪs)

n.
coagulation of the blood within a blood vessel in any part of the circulatory system.
[1700–10; < New Latin < Greek thrómbōsis. See thrombus, -osis]
throm•bot′ic (-ˈbɒt ɪk) adj.

thrombosis

A condition involving blood clotting within an artery or vein and possibly cutting off or obstructing the flow of blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thrombosis - the formation or presence of a thrombus (a clot of coagulated blood attached at the site of its formation) in a blood vesselthrombosis - the formation or presence of a thrombus (a clot of coagulated blood attached at the site of its formation) in a blood vessel
occlusion - closure or blockage (as of a blood vessel)
cerebral thrombosis - a blood clot in a cerebral artery or vein
coronary, coronary thrombosis - obstruction of blood flow in a coronary artery by a blood clot (thrombus)
milk leg, phlegmasia alba dolens, white leg - painful thrombosis of the femoral vein in the leg following childbirth
phlebothrombosis, venous thrombosis - thrombosis of a vein without prior inflammation of the vein; associated with sluggish blood flow (as in prolonged bedrest or pregnancy or surgery) or with rapid coagulation of the blood
thrombus - a blood clot formed within a blood vessel and remaining attached to its place of origin

thrombosis

noun blood clot, embolism, infarction, coronary thrombosis, embolus Thinning of the blood reduces the chances of thrombosis.
Translations
trombóza
trombózis

thrombosis

[θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs] N (thromboses (pl)) [θrɒmˈbəʊsiːz]trombosis f
coronary thrombosistrombosis f coronaria

thrombosis

[θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs] nthrombose f

thrombosis

nThrombose f

thrombosis

[θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs] ntrombosi f inv
coronary thrombosis → trombosi coronarica

throm·bo·sis

n. trombosis, formación, desarrollo y presencia de un trombo;
biliary ______ biliar;
cardiac ______ cardíaca;
coronary ______ coronaria;
embolic ______ embólica;
traumatic ______ traumática;
venous ______venosa.

thrombosis

n (pl -ses) trombosis f; deep venous — (DVT) trombosis venosa profunda (TVP)
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 EQUITYBITES-February 14, 2018-GC Pharma and Lee's Pharmaceutical (HK) Limited partnership develop and commercialise GCC-4401C for thromboembolic disease
M2 PHARMA-February 14, 2018-GC Pharma and Lee's Pharmaceutical (HK) Limited partnership develop and commercialise GCC-4401C for thromboembolic disease
Out of these patients, all except two had received chemotherapy for their primary disease which is a known predisposing factor for thromboembolic disease.
pleuritic chest pain, signs of cardiac failure, no clear identification of infectious origin) and in those with a prior history of thromboembolic disease.
This edition retains the overall structure from the previous one, but each section has been updated and a chapter on venous thromboembolic disease has been added.
Thromboembolic disease is not an uncommon severe complication in nephrotic syndrome.
It is mostly used to exclude thromboembolic disease and to diagnose blood disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation.
Spiral chest CT angiography and Doppler sonography did not demonstrate deep vein thrombosis or evidence of pulmonary thromboembolic disease.
Thromboembolic disease affects about 15% of cancer patients and remains a challenge for modern medicine for both prophylaxis and treatment [1].
2) Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and a creatinine clearance greater than 95 mL/ min should not be treated with edoxaban because they are more likely to suffer from thromboembolic disease compared with similar patients taking warfarin.
Conditions causing reduced pulmonary arterial perfusion, such as chronic thromboembolic disease and vasculitic disorders, lead to a gradual increase in the bronchial arterial contribution.
Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) (2) have been used to treat thromboembolic disease for over 60 years, and they continue to be the most commonly prescribed anticoagulants worldwide.