Book of the Dead

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Related to Tibetan book of the dead: Egyptian Book of the Dead

Book of the Dead

n.
A collection of ancient Egyptian funerary texts from various periods, containing prayers, magic formulas, and hymns to be used by the soul of the deceased for guidance and protection on its journey to the afterlife.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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There's a section called, "Operas come and go." That section opens with the opening music of The Tibetan Book of the Dead.
These references to wombs and womb-doors can be traced back to Evans-Wentz's Tibetan Book of the Dead and its warning that in "selecting the womb-door," "good wombs may appear bad and bad wombs may appear good" (1960, 2,191).
Perhaps the most remarkable map of prebirth as a spirit down journey is found in the Tibetan Book of the Dead (or Bardo Thod
It is a sure sign of a warped life and a meretricious culture when Steppenwolf, the I Ching, the Tibetan Book of the Dead, G.
Inside this courtyard there are as a rule the four basic colours, red, green, white, and yellow, which represent the four directions and also the psychic functions, as the Tibetan Book of the Dead shows.
Before she eats, she blesses her food, often with a passage from The Tibetan Book Of The Dead. On set she sips mineral water, but only if it's at room temperature, as she thinks cold water is hard to digest.
Her black gown and shaved head with a single braid evoked The Tibetan Book of the Dead, on which this rather frightening but mesmerizing piece was based.
Researching this book, I found another written in the Eighth Century called The Tibetan Book of the Dead, which described in the minutest detail every step that man must take in his journey from Earth to the Afterlife.
In an epigraph from a commentary on The Tibetan Book of the Dead, the reader is reminded of the transitoriness of the temporal world compared with "the experiencer's own consciousness, which has no birth and no death, and is by its very nature immutable light." The title poem opening the volume echoes this spiritual stance: "become a still pool/ in the anarchic flow, the street's/ unceasing carnival/ of haunted and redeemed." What follows are haunting poems which suggest why a spiritual discipline might be necessary for a poet who has taken as her subject children witnessing violence in the home and class violence in the larger s ociety.
The Tibetan Book of the Dead is integrated with his knowledge of quantum physics in order to help the reader understand the complexities of reality and spiritual beliefs and traditions.
They are often philosophical, sometimes spiritual; the latter primarily in reference to the Tibetan Book of the Dead. Stark frequently cuts from the immediate episode to related anecdotes.
These sources span time, geography, and disciplines, from Augustine's treatise on "Memory" in his Confessions to the Buddhist Tibetan Book of the Dead, from Al-Ghazzali's Alchemy of Happiness to Oliver Saks's Anthropologist on Mars.

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