Book of the Dead

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Related to Tibetan book of the dead: Egyptian Book of the Dead

Book of the Dead

n.
A collection of ancient Egyptian funerary texts from various periods, containing prayers, magic formulas, and hymns to be used by the soul of the deceased for guidance and protection on its journey to the afterlife.
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That section opens with the opening music of The Tibetan Book of the Dead.
These references to wombs and womb-doors can be traced back to Evans-Wentz's Tibetan Book of the Dead and its warning that in "selecting the womb-door," "good wombs may appear bad and bad wombs may appear good" (1960, 2,191).
Her black gown and shaved head with a single braid evoked The Tibetan Book of the Dead, on which this rather frightening but mesmerizing piece was based.
Researching this book, I found another written in the Eighth Century called The Tibetan Book of the Dead, which described in the minutest detail every step that man must take in his journey from Earth to the Afterlife.
In an epigraph from a commentary on The Tibetan Book of the Dead, the reader is reminded of the transitoriness of the temporal world compared with "the experiencer's own consciousness, which has no birth and no death, and is by its very nature immutable light.
Included here are substantial portions of three full-length works: To Master--A Long Goodbye (1946), a biographical treatment of Josiah Henson, the real-life model for Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom; The Process (1969), a novel written in Tangier, set primarily in North Africa, and narrated by an African American dubbed Hassan Merikani (a Gysin persona); and The Last Museum (1986), a surrealistic romp (with illustrations by Keith Haring) that draws on Gysin's experiences at the Beat Hotel in Paris, outlandish fictions, and the Tibetan Book of the Dead.
The Tibetan Book of the Dead is integrated with his knowledge of quantum physics in order to help the reader understand the complexities of reality and spiritual beliefs and traditions.
They are often philosophical, sometimes spiritual; the latter primarily in reference to the Tibetan Book of the Dead.
These sources span time, geography, and disciplines, from Augustine's treatise on "Memory" in his Confessions to the Buddhist Tibetan Book of the Dead, from Al-Ghazzali's Alchemy of Happiness to Oliver Saks's Anthropologist on Mars.
The Tibetan Book of the Dead, New York, NY, Oxford UP, 2000, 357pp.
Inspired by the Tibetan Book of the Dead, the oneiric obsessions of Carl Jung, and the art works of Willima Blake, Lodela is no New Age, nebulous invocation of a crystal-induced spiritual nirvana.
She planned going to the hospital to read to her mother selections from the Tibetan Book of the Dead - a religious text with elaborate descriptions of what one encounters subsequent to physical death.

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