Tibullus


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Tibullus

(tɪˈbʌləs)
n
(Biography) Albius (ˈælbɪəs). ?54–?19 bc, Roman elegiac poet
References in periodicals archive ?
Quintilian ranked him with Albius Tibullus, Sextus Propertius, and Ovid.
Since poets like Horace and Tibullus hardly seem to stand on a par with men like Maecenas and Messalla, we find it difficult to think of them as truly friends.
There are six elegies by Sulpicia preserved in the corpus of poems by the male poet Tibullus.
He exerted wide influence on subsequent poets, such as Tibullus (54?
In the emerging Roman love elegy of Propertius and Tibullus, however, the adjectives mollis and iners, and the nouns inertia and mollitia, appear frequently both as characteristics of poetic aesthetic principles and as qualities of the bodies of the speakers or love objects.
Lectiones Memorabiles; Volume 1: Selections From Catullus, Cicero, Livy, Ovid, Propertius, Tibullus, and Vergil
Neither Tibullus (I 5, 9) nor Propertius (II 28, 27: quo sit formosa periclo; cf.
I suggest mores non uescitur altos, 'does not feed on lofty characters'; uescor would be used with the accusative, a rare construction but firmly found in elegy at Tibullus 2.
Dr Murgatroyd had failed to get his revised PhD thesis, a commentary on Tibullus I, accepted by Brill without a hefty subsidy, and the University of Natal Press regarded it as "too sophisticated" since it contained Greek.
The book is presented in three sections; the first gives the context of the woman and the time in which she lived; the second presents sources from Cicero, Catullus, Sallust, Quintilian, and Plutarch; the final offers the legacy of Clodia through Propertius, Tibullus, Ovid, and Martial.
The textual references reveal the author's two types of approach: his classical erudition (Horace, Juvenal, Lucan, Lucretius, Martial, Ovid, Propertius, Seneca, Statius, Tibullus, Vergil) and his leanings towards later authors especially popular in the Middle Ages (Ausonius, Boethius, Claudian, Disticha Catoonis).
Cassandre was born too late to be sung by the Roman Tibullus, he reminds her, but never mind: "tu te dois contenter / De veoir ton nom par la France chanter, / Autant que Laure en Tuscan anoblie / Se voit chanter par la belle Italie" ("you must content yourself with seeing your name sung throughout France, as much as Laura, ennobled in Tuscan, finds herself sung throughout fair Italy").