tidal force

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tidal force

n.
A differential gravitational force acting along an extended body as a result of the varying distance from a source of gravity to the different parts of the body, such as the force of the moon on the earth's oceans closest to and farthest from the moon.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's what staff call the 'tidal effect' - during the morning rush hour many people ride in to the city centre leaving few Nextbike stations in the area with free racks, but leaving emptier stations in the suburbs of Cardiff.
As Venus has no moon, there is no tidal effect to worry about.
Enceladus has an elliptical orbit around Saturn, and the planet's tidal effect is thought to deform the moon's icy shell, which has an average thickness of about 20-25 kilometers (12-15 miles) but is only 1-5 kilometers thick near the south pole.
"I always thought I was a puncher and a banger, but I won an ABA title and then all of a sudden I met Jimmy Albertina, won another ABA title, then won another and it's been a tidal effect from winning that first ABA title.
They've been well instructed that each of the millions of pebbles in your yard has a greater tidal effect on your body (water or otherwise) than Jupiter, Mars, or Venus do.
The gravity of the moon causes a tidal effect on the oceans of the Earth.
Many previous researches of tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle focused mainly on the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and particle organic carbon (POC) exchange between coast and sea [4-7].
This does not have a tidal effect because it is associated with axial rotation and merely becomes part of the equatorial bulge of rotation.