tiger cat

(redirected from Tiger Cats)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

tiger cat

n.
1. Any of various small wild felines, such as the ocelot, margay, or jaguarundi, that resemble the tiger in appearance or behavior.
2. A domestic cat, especially a tabby, having markings like those of a tiger.

tiger cat

n
1. (Animals) a medium-sized feline mammal, Felis tigrina, of Central and South America, having a dark-striped coat
2. (Animals) any similar feline with tiger-like markings, such as the margay

ti′ger cat`


n.
1. any of various striped or spotted wildcats smaller than but resembling the tiger, as the serval.
2. a domestic cat having a striped coat resembling that of a tiger.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tiger cat - medium-sized wildcat of Central America and South America having a dark-striped coattiger cat - medium-sized wildcat of Central America and South America having a dark-striped coat
Felis, genus Felis - type genus of the Felidae: true cats and most wildcats
wildcat - any small or medium-sized cat resembling the domestic cat and living in the wild
2.tiger cat - a cat having a striped coat
domestic cat, Felis catus, Felis domesticus, house cat - any domesticated member of the genus Felis
References in classic literature ?
Gleaming tiger cat's teeth curved upward from holes pierced to receive them in the upper half of each ear.
Ferrari had a passion for history, the culinary arts and was a die-hard Hamilton Tiger Cats and Pittsburgh Steelers fan.
We found three Southern tiger cats using a combined area of 37.22 [km.sup.2] (100% MCP), resulting on a minimal density of 0.08 individuals/[km.sup.2].
Recently, insights about the effect of the presence and density of ocelots over ecological parameters of smaller species were described, showing that Southern tiger cat (Leopardus guttulus) (Schreber, 1775), margay (Leopardus wiedii) (Schinz, 1821) and jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi) (E.
In Time as History (1969), his book on Nietzsche, he attached the word "pathetic" to "the performance of the quarterback for the Hamilton Tiger Cats this season." A hardy perennial, that remark.
It was in 1959 in Toronto against the Hamilton Tiger Cats. The score was 21 to 7 in favor of the Bombers.