Tiggerish

Tiggerish

(ˈtɪɡərɪʃ)
adj
irrepressibly bouncy and cheerful
[C20: after Tigger, a character in the Winnie the Pooh children's stories by A. A. Milne]
References in periodicals archive ?
Tiggerish Jane Fonda, 79, also showed the youngsters how it's done, prowling the runway in a skin-tight tiger-print maxi dress.
It certainly enables Nao Sakuma to complete her superbly rounded performance as Swanilda, the high-spirited heroine who temporarily impersonates the eponymous automaton, while Chi Cao offers a typically Tiggerish turn as Franz.
It sounds like it shouldn't work, but somehow it does, all underpinned by the Tiggerish enthusiasm of leader singer Ninja, urging on the crowd - and even attempting a bit of Welsh at one point.
But he brings a youthful, Tiggerish charm to the role.
BY a massive coincidence, three shows on this page today have someone called "Roobs" in them but the most popular must be Monty Halls' Tiggerish black dog.
Talk to Sebald's contemporaries and one realizes that they find it hard to understand how their tiggerish friend 'Sbe', who enjoyed all the usual activities of a normal adolescent growing up in a remote, carefree environment in the 1950s, could have become the troubled Bundesmelancholiker of the 1990s.
And in a combination of Linnaean-like rigour and Tiggerish enthusiasm, he started to list and codify each one of the nation's housing types.
Chris Tarrant has based his entire career on turning Tiggerish.
And "two brains" David Willetts is more tiggerish than tigerish.
Clarke, whose slightly bouncy, Tiggerish qualities are kept brilliantly in check by his wife Judy, is not short of two hundred grand but, while the price may seem unreal, the reasons for the sale are deeply rooted in a candid acceptance of racing's harsh realities.