Tiglath-pileser III

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Tiglath-pileser III

n
(Biography) known as Pulu. died ?727 bc, king of Assyria (745–727), who greatly extended his empire, subjugating Syria and Palestine

Tig•lath-pi•le•ser III

(ˈtɪg læθ pɪˈli zər, -paɪ-)
n.
died 727 B.C., king of Assyria 745–727.
References in periodicals archive ?
Next to the royal hunt in the middle of the west wall, at 1:43 is a cast of the right half of the stone panel depicting a siege of an enemy town from the Central Palace of Tiglath-pileser III at Nimrud held in the British Museum (BM 115634-118903) (Fig.
Professor Hayim Tadmor, an eminent Assyriologist and historian, states that Assyrian reliefs, from the time of Tiglath-pileser III onward, frequently portray an "Assyrian scribe" writing on a board or tablet next to an "Aramaic scribe" writing on papyrus or a parchment scroll.
Other kings represented include Tiglath-Pileser III (744-727 BCE), Sargon II (721-705 BCE), Sennacherib (704-681 BCE), and Ashurbanipal (669-627 BCE).
During the brief reign of Pekah, the king of Israel was persuaded by Rezin, the king of Aram-Damascus to form a coalition, which Judah refused to join, in order to resist the growing strength of the Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III.
Tiglath-Pileser I, King of Assyria (1114--1076 BCE) assembled a library in the city of Assur.
"Tayinat was destroyed by the Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser III in 738 BCE, and then transformed into an Assyrian provincial capital, equipped with its own governor and imperial administration," said Harrison.
On the other hand, the destruction of the gate and the stela can quite confidently be related to Tiglath-Pileser's 733/32 BC campaign, providing a reliable terminus ante quem (Bernett & Keel 1998: 2-7).
Consequently, Halpern develops his "Tiglath-Pileser Principle," the marriage of truth plus spin.
calls this tendency "the Tiglath-Pileser principle." His method for dealing with such propaganda is "the principle of minimal interpretation," asking "what is the minimum the king might have done to lay claim to the achievements he publishes?" (127).