Tiglath-pileser III


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Tiglath-pileser III

n
(Biography) known as Pulu. died ?727 bc, king of Assyria (745–727), who greatly extended his empire, subjugating Syria and Palestine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Tig•lath-pi•le•ser III

(ˈtɪg læθ pɪˈli zər, -paɪ-)
n.
died 727 B.C., king of Assyria 745–727.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Next to the royal hunt in the middle of the west wall, at 1:43 is a cast of the right half of the stone panel depicting a siege of an enemy town from the Central Palace of Tiglath-pileser III at Nimrud held in the British Museum (BM 115634-118903) (Fig.
Professor Hayim Tadmor, an eminent Assyriologist and historian, states that Assyrian reliefs, from the time of Tiglath-pileser III onward, frequently portray an "Assyrian scribe" writing on a board or tablet next to an "Aramaic scribe" writing on papyrus or a parchment scroll.
Other kings represented include Tiglath-Pileser III (744-727 BCE), Sargon II (721-705 BCE), Sennacherib (704-681 BCE), and Ashurbanipal (669-627 BCE).
During the brief reign of Pekah, the king of Israel was persuaded by Rezin, the king of Aram-Damascus to form a coalition, which Judah refused to join, in order to resist the growing strength of the Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III. In 732 BCE Damascus was destroyed and those inhabitants who survived were taken away in chains.
153-54 as part of Appendix B), seven depend on or are substantiated by newly or relatively newly published texts (Kurba'il Statue of Shalmaneser III (1962), Tell Rimah stela of Adad-narari III (1968), Iran stela of Tiglath-pileser III (1972)), or newly edited texts.
Similar sprigs first appear on the reliefs of Tiglath-pileser III (744-27 BCE) (Bleibtreu 1980: 94-95, pl.
His example was followed by Tiglath-pileser III and by Sennacherib, whose Lachish reliefs bear witness to the flaying and impaling of chosen victims (see note 14 above).
The Correspondence of Tiglath-pileser III and Sargon II from Calah/Nimrud.
After Assyrian monarch Tiglath-Pileser III campaigned in and ultimately captured and exiled Israel, the Northern Kingdom (621 BCE), Judah, the Southern Kingdom, became a vassal state of the Assyrian Empire.
Chapter two presents the archaeological evidence for the campaigns of Tiglath-pileser III, Shalmaneser V, and Sargon II against the kingdom of Israel, whose capital city Samaria was ultimately captured in 722 B.C.E.