time-out

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time-out

or time·out (tīm′out′)
n.
1. Sports A brief cessation of play at the request of a sports team or an official for rest, consultation, or making substitutions.
2. A short break from work or play.
3.
a. A corrective measure or punishment for young children in which they are separated from others for a brief period.
b. The place, especially a chair, used for such a measure or punishment.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

time-out

n
1. (General Sporting Terms) sport an interruption in play during which players rest, discuss tactics, or make substitutions
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a break taken during working hours
3. (Computer Science) computing a condition occurring when the amount of time a computer has been instructed to wait for another device to perform a task has expired, usually indicated by an error message
vb
(Computer Science) (intr) (of a computer) to stop operating because of a time-out
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

time′-out′

or time′out′,



n., pl. -outs.
1. a brief suspension of activity; break.
2. an interruption of play in a sports contest.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.time-out - a brief suspension of playtime-out - a brief suspension of play; "each team has two time-outs left"
athletic game - a game involving athletic activity
pause, suspension, intermission, interruption, break - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

time-out

noun
A pause or interval, as from work or duty:
Informal: breather.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

time-out

n (US)
(Ftbl, Basketball) → Auszeit f
(= break) to take time-outPause machen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The second set saw Murray lose his serve three times and he struggled physically during the third set, receiving treatment on his left thigh during two medical time-outs which he said was for "cramping".
I Have a Toddler: Tackling These Crazy Awesome Years--No Time-outs Needed (Gallery, $16.99, 9781982109738, audio/eBook available)--especially that part about no time-outs, once a mainstay in our household.
My mom and dad give me tons of talking to's and time-outs. Believe me.'
The combined technologies will help prevent response time-outs, which can occur during the booking process, resulting in frustrated customers and lost revenue.
Anaeli's mom reports that she is often disciplined by long time-outs in the classroom bathroom and worries that this discipline is causing Anaeli to withhold stool to a point of loosing control and soiling herself.
The 33-year-old described previous "time-outs", when Scott, who has battled depression, went off by himself.
Sharjah tried to get back on track, and after two time-outs Al Wasl continued its scoring spree that gave them the second set with a 15-point score difference of 25-10.
Low incidence of time-outs and high quality speedy maintenance have meant time dedicated to the deposit process has reduced significantly.
There are no ads now,  but the NBA would like to give users "branded experience" in VR so they can interact during time-outs.
Identified as someone who needed additional support, he was on a personalised behaviour chart, needed several 'time-outs' a day and received internal exclusions.
In a match that featured 14 breaks of serve and two medical time-outs, four straight breaks gave the 23-year-old Brit the first set but not before the trainer came on twice for Errani.

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