timocracy

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ti·moc·ra·cy

 (tī-mŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. ti·moc·ra·cies
1. A state described by Plato as being governed on principles of honor and military glory.
2. An Aristotelian state in which civic honor or political power increases with the amount of property one owns.

[Obsolete French tymocracie, from Medieval Latin tīmocratia, from Greek tīmokratiā : tīmē, honor, value + -kratiā, -cracy.]

ti′mo·crat′ic (tī′mə-krăt′ĭk) adj.

timocracy

(taɪˈmɒkrəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political unit or system in which possession of property serves as the first requirement for participation in government
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political unit or system in which love of honour is deemed the guiding principle of government
[C16: from Old French tymocracie, ultimately from Greek timokratia, from timē worth, honour, price + -cracy]
timocratic, ˌtimoˈcratical adj

ti•moc•ra•cy

(taɪˈmɒk rə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. government in which love of honor is the dominant motive of the rulers.
2. government in which a certain amount of property is requisite as a qualification for office.
[1580–90; ultimately < Greek tīmokratía=tīmo-, comb. form of tīmḗ honor, worth + -kratia -cracy]
ti`mo•crat′ic (-məˈkræt ɪk) adj.

timocracy

1. Platonism. a state in which a love of honor and glory is the guiding principle of the rulers.
2. Aristotelianism. a state in which the ownership of property is a qualification for office. — timocratie, timocratical, adj.
See also: Government
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the philosopher-king who seeks wisdom, the timocrat who dedicates himself to war, or the oligarch who focuses on making money, the man of democracy is marked by the absence of a specific orientation in his desires.
This timocrat's position thus raises problems concerning the intrinsic value of the spirited part of the soul, problems that are best solved by comparing the auxiliary to the timocrat, both of whom represent different forms of second-best morality.
In Deifira, he associates the interlocutor Filarco with the timocrat described in book 8 of Plato's Republic, which he considers the "la vera chiave di lettura" of the dialogue (39).