necrosis

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Related to Tissue necrosis: Necrotic tissue

ne·cro·sis

 (nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. ne·cro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

[Late Latin necrōsis, a causing to die, killing, from Greek nekrōsis, death, from nekroun, to make dead, from nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.

necrosis

(nɛˈkrəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) the death of one or more cells in the body, usually within a localized area, as from an interruption of the blood supply to that part
2. (Botany) death of plant tissue due to disease, frost, etc
[C17: New Latin from Greek nekrōsis, from nekroun to kill, from nekros corpse]
necrotic adj

ne•cro•sis

(nəˈkroʊ sɪs)

n.
death of a circumscribed portion of animal or plant tissue.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek nékrōsis state of death = nekrō-, variant s. of nekroûn to kill, mortify]
ne•crot′ic (-ˈkrɒt ɪk) adj.
nec•ro•tize (ˈnɛk rəˌtaɪz) v.i., v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.

necrosis

the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Death, Decaying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
Translations
nekroosi
afstervingnecrose

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnécrose f

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnecrosi f inv

necrosis

n necrosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
nucleatum as well as most other anaerobes cause acute exudative infiltrates and tissue necrosis. In comparison, Actinomyces organisms are characterized by a chronic course and extensive fibrosis, often mimicking malignancy.
Infection, tissue necrosis, chronic inflammation and glaucoma are some of the post-operative complications observed after keratoprosthesis.
In addition to tension-induced edema and inflammation created by pressurized water, tissue necrosis and infections due to secondary microorganisms that transfer into the tissue from the outside also increase edema and inflammation (6).
ROS is produced mainly by neutrophils and macrophages at wound sites and protect the host against bacterial and fungal infection.19 But excessive production of ROS might lead to dysruption of cell membrane, apoptosis and tissue necrosis, hence prolonging the inflammatory phase leading to delayed wound healing in skin and mucosa20.
Cerium nitrate treatment prevents progressive tissue necrosis in the zone of stasis following burn.
For example, a single injection of TAA caused acute liver injury in rats in the form of tissue necrosis and severe leukocytes infiltration between 6-60 h following TAA injections; whereas, biomarkers of tissue necrosis, iNOS and NF-kB assessed in liver tissue peaked at one h post TAA injection (Chen et al., 2008).
IIM is a group of conditions that affect the skeletal muscles which can result in progressive muscle weakness, in some cases leading to tissue necrosis and disability.
As the ultrasound propagates through tissue and at high acoustic intensities, absorption of the energy can induce targeted tissue necrosis within a well-defined volume without damaging the overlying tissue.
A man whose stench forced a passenger jet&nbsp;to make an emergency landing in Portugal died from tissue necrosis on June 25.
On skin or inhaled symptoms can include itching, bleaching or darkening of skin, burning sensations, trouble breathing, coughing blood and/or tissue necrosis.