Titanoboa


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Titanoboa

(ˌtaɪtənəˈbəʊə)
n
a genus of giant prehistoric snake of the Palaeocene epoch, having a body length exceeding 12 metres
[from New Latin, literally ‘titanic boa’]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Titanoboa: The largest snake ever discovered, this vast carnivore would hunt in a similar way to modern day constrictors, but could eat crocodiles and large mammals!
BIG BEASTS: LAST OF THE GIANTS SKY1, 9pm IF YOU ever came across a Titanoboa, you might want to run in the other direction.
The world is full of huge creatures BIG BEASTS: LAST OF THE GIANTS SKY1, 9pm IF you ever came across a Titanoboa, you might want to run in the other direction.
Kickstarter is perhaps best known for its most successful, bizarre, and creative projects: $67,436 to build a statue of Roboeop in Detroit; $10,560 to fund Titanoboa, a 50-foot electromechanical snake; $572,891 to develop a facemask to help people lucid dream; $50,026 to fund a videogame history museum.
Titanoboa: Monster Snake tells of a snake that is longer than a bus and eats crocs for breakfast!
But the giant version appeared five million years after the dinosaurs vanished, during a period when giant varieties of many different reptiles - including Titanoboa cerrejonensis, the largest snake ever discovered - lived in this part of South America.
Available in both DVD and Blu-ray formats, Titanoboa: Monster Snake is a jaw-dropping documentary about a gigantic species of boa snake that lived 60 million years ago, in the era after the mass extinction of the dinosaurs.
The fossils of a titanoboa, that lived 60 million years ago, have been found.
Named Titanoboa cerrejonensis, and estimated to have lived 58 to 60 million years ago, this snake at twice the size of the largest anacondas alive today, was about the size of a city bus.
Named Titanoboa cerrejonensis by its discoverers, the size of the snake's vertebrae suggest it weighed 2,500 pounds and measured 43 feet nose to tall tip-and that is a conservative estimate.
The snake, named Titanoboa cerrejonensis, lived in tropical rain forests 60 million years ago.