To show off

to exhibit ostentatiously.
to make a show; to display one's self.

See also: Show, Show

References in classic literature ?
Steward expected something of him, wanted him to show off.
I wrote it thinking it would sound very witty; but now that I have seen myself that I only wanted to show off in a despicable way--I will not scratch it out on purpose
The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off.
He was just enough civilized to show off his outlandishness in the strangest possible manner.
We stood about fifteen and a half hands high; we were therefore just as good for riding as we were for driving, and our master used to say that he disliked either horse or man that could do but one thing; and as he did not want to show off in London parks, he preferred a more active and useful kind of horse.
He did not care about his soldiers, he did not care about the theatre; he only liked to go out walking to show off his new clothes.
It's nice to have accomplishments and be elegant, but not to show off or get perked up," said Amy thoughtfully.
At least, therefore, I did not assume the character of needless precipitance merely to show off before the ladies.
It was all in French, and Philip knew that she wrote in that language to show off, but he was worried all the same.
Or go to church next Sunday, and watch a certain family filing in, the boy lifting his legs high to show off his new boots, but all the others demure, especially the timid, unobservant-looking little woman in the rear of them.
Miss Power used to have us up to show off when people came.
Dan sarcastically inquired if all she went to church for was to show off her fine clothes and look at other people's; then they quarrelled and didn't speak to each other for two days, much to Cecily's distress.