infinitive

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Related to To-infinitive: bare infinitive

infinitive

An infinitive is the most basic form of a verb. It is “unmarked” (which means that it is not conjugated for tense or person), and it is preceded by the particle to.
Infinitives are known as non-finite verbs, meaning they do not express actions being performed by the subjects of clauses. Instead, infinitives function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs to describe actions as ideas.
Infinitives are distinct from a similar construction known as bare infinitives or the base forms of verbs, which are simply infinitives without the particle to.
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in·fin·i·tive

 (ĭn-fĭn′ĭ-tĭv)
n. Abbr. inf. or infin.
A verb form that functions as a substantive while retaining certain verbal characteristics, such as modification by adverbs, and that in English may be preceded by to, as in To go willingly is to show strength or We want him to work harder, or may also occur without to, as in She had them read the letter or We may finish today. See Usage Note at split infinitive.

[From Middle English infinitif, of an infinitive, from Old French, from Late Latin īnfīnītīvus, unlimited, indefinite, infinitive, from Latin īnfīnītus, infinite; see infinite.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

infinitive

(ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv)
n
(Grammar) a form of the verb not inflected for grammatical categories such as tense and person and used without an overt subject. In English, the infinitive usually consists of the word to followed by the verb
infinitival adj
inˈfinitively, ˌinfiniˈtivally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•fin•i•tive

(ɪnˈfɪn ɪ tɪv)
n.
1. a nonfinite verb form, in many languages the simple or basic form of the verb, that names the action or state without specifying the subject and that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs or, in English, after the word to, as eat in I want to eat.
adj.
2. consisting of or containing an infinitive: an infinitive clause. Abbr.: infin.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin infīnītīvus, derivative of Latin infīnīt(us) indefinite, infinitival]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

infinitive

The basic uninflected form of a verb, usually accompanied by “to” as in “to be.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infinitive - the uninflected form of the verb
split infinitive - an infinitive with an adverb between `to' and the verb (e.g., `to boldly go')
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
صيغَة المَصْدَرمَصْدَرٌ
infinitivneurčitek
infinitivnavnemåde
infinitiivi
infinitiv
fõnévi igenévfőnévi igenév
nafnháttur
不定詞
부정사
bendratis
infinitīvs, nenoteiksme
infinitiv
neurčitok
nedoločnik
infinitiv
รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to
fiilin ...-mek/mak hâlimastarsonsuz
nguyên thể

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) → infinitivo
B. Ninfinitivo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv] n (GRAMMAR) [verb] → infinitif m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

infinitive

(Gram)
adjInfinitiv-, infinitivisch; infinitive formInfinitivform f
nInfinitiv m, → Grundform f; in the infinitiveim Infinitiv
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → infinito/a
2. ninfinito
in the infinitive → all'infinito
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

infinitive

(inˈfinətiv) noun
the part of the verb used in English with or without to, that expresses an action but has no subject. The sentence `You need not stay if you want to go' contains two infinitives, stay and go.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

infinitive

مَصْدَرٌ infinitiv infinitiv Infinitiv απαρέμφατο infinitivo infinitiivi infinitif infinitiv infinito 不定詞 부정사 infinitief infinitiv bezokolicznik infinitivo неопределенная форма глагола infinitiv รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to sonsuz nguyên thể 不定词
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
During the course of history, dare seems to have developed a number of features which are more typically associated with lexical verbs than with auxiliaries in English, such as the weak past tense form dared (instead of the original 'preterite-present' durst) and complementation with the to-infinitive rather than the bare infinitive (cf.
The combination of the old auxiliary form durst (dare) and a to-infinitive complement, as in (5), is another feature of blend constructions, which is statistically marginal (see Schluter 2010: 307).
(1) In this type of constructions, the infinitive occurs in the complement of verbs and, depending on the verb, it may be either marked (+TO), i.e., a to-infinitive, or unmarked (-TO), i.e., a bare infinitive.
This difference could be attributed to the fact that Rautionaho did not included the to-infinitive + progressive construction, which in fact is significantly higher (p<0.001) in BrE than in the other varieties considered.
With to-infinitive clause devoid of subject: 'I don't believe that there is any thing to be called an intrigue'.
The constructions with -ing have been invariably compared with similar constructions with to-infinitive in order to explain the status of the -ing form.
A category that came up is to-infinitive (as a complement to appoint and elect).
It is important to highlight here that in these cases it is very common for the new entity created as a result of the joining to be explicitly expressed in the sentence by means of a to-infinitive or a prepositional phrase (normally introduced by in).
First, she notes that, unlike the prevailing tendency in ME and E1, by E3 the bare infinitive is five times as frequent as the to-infinitive. This is clear characterization of need as an auxiliary.
Fischer 1992: 405), while most full verbs underwent the process of adopting the to-infinitive in the Middle English period.
"To-futeisi-no imi-ni tuite (About the meaning of to-infinitive)".
She argues and convincingly demonstrates that the to-infinitive in OE can no longer be analyzed as prepositional and should instead be analyzed as clausal.