toadyism


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Related to toadyism: sycophantic, sycophants

toadyism

a fawning flattery, obsequiousness, or sycophancy. — toady, n.toadyish, adj,
See also: Behavior
References in classic literature ?
Even in the School-house, by dint of his command of money, the constant supply of good things which he kept up, and his adroit toadyism, he had managed to make himself not only tolerated, but rather popular amongst his own contemporaries; although young Brooke scarcely spoke to him, and one or two others of the right sort showed their opinions of him whenever a chance offered.
It's to be debased into toadyism, which probably explains the record-setting staff turnover of 34 percent, according to an analysis from the Brookings Institution.
12) "Shabby Toadyism," KCNA, June 27, 1997; "Japan's Bid to Internationalize 'Abduction Issues' under Fire," KCNA, April 27, 2005; "Bush Administration's Korea Policy Accused," KCNA, April 6,2003; "Army and People of DPRK Pledge Revenge on Enemies: CPRK Secretariat," KCNA, March 29, 2013; "Indignation Meetings of Youth and Students," KCNA, December 11, 1998; "Anti-U.
Its shifting stances in the 1930s and during the war had exposed its toadyism to Moscow, shattering the illusions of many party members.
What kind of system is this that encourages toadyism and sycophancy?
Favoritism in personnel decisions encourages toadyism and discourages underlings from speaking their minds or using their expertise if it threatens their career.
Kierkegaard sets up a continuously chosen Christian love of the neighbor as his ethical apogee, while self-loving and quickly-fading eros (along with compliance, toadyism and alliance) isn't even worthy of the word (Kierkegaard, 1995, 7).
Alderman Fletcher Moss noted, 'The ceremony was rather spoilt by the disgusting adulation and toadyism paid by a few of the performers .