Tolkien

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Tolkien

(ˈtɒlkiːn)
n
(Biography) J(ohn) R(onald) R(euel). 1892–1973, British philologist and writer, born in South Africa. He is best known for The Hobbit (1937), the trilogy The Lord of the Rings (1954–55), and the posthumously published The Silmarillion (1977)
ˌTolkienˈesque adj

Tol•kien

(ˈtoʊl kin, ˈtɒl-)

n.
J(ohn) R(onald) R(euel), 1892–1973, English novelist and philologist, born in South Africa.
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Noun1.Tolkien - British philologist and writer of fantasies (born in South Africa) (1892-1973)Tolkien - British philologist and writer of fantasies (born in South Africa) (1892-1973)
References in periodicals archive ?
The setting is a mixture of modern Los Angeles and a Tolkienesque land that will appeal strongly to many fans of urban fantasy.
05pm Jim Henson's Tolkienesque fantasy adventure centres on Jen, a survivor of a near-extinct race.
Having mastered the art of war through historical ages as diverse as the Roman and Napoleonic empires, Total War developers Creative Assembly turn their attentions to the realm of fantasy, picking up the Tolkienesque battlegrounds of Warhammer.
Based on a hugely popular online video game, it's set in an extraodinarily designed Tolkienesque world of humans, orcs, dwarves, elves and wizards.
From demigods, to Tolkienesque elves, to vampires, to Star Trek's Q; extraordinary beings captivate our imaginations and provide a platform for people to reflect on questions, such as will we ever be capable of escaping death, and what are the implications?
The game spawned many imitations, including the very Tolkienesque Akalabeth: World of Doom (1979), a game that used maps to conceptualize the game world for the players.
Jeff Smith, the editor of the Best American Comics 2013 anthology, owes his fame to Bone (1991-2004), a terrifically entertaining all-ages narrative in which three funny-animal characters straight out of Pogo get stuck in a Tolkienesque land of dragons and prophesied queens.
The plots of mythopoeic fantasy "must end happily" (Oziewicz 87), but in a Tolkienesque rather than Hollywood fashion.
In Kay's Tolkienesque trilogy, The Fionovar Tapestry, the diegesis includes our world and a fantasy realm, with a group of students magically transported from Toronto into Fionavar at the start of the series.
With a Tolkienesque structure of maps and ancient runes, it takes the reader on a breathtaking odyssey through the nine worlds.
These have a distinctly Tolkienesque flavour and you really feel that Frodo and his chums could emerge from behind a boulder at any moment.