Tolstoyism


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Tolstoyism

doctrines espoused in the works of Tolstoy, Russian novelist and social critic. — Tolstoyist, n.
See also: Literary Style
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Indeed, the Russian document he produced (together with Nikolaev) is, first, a declaration of the tenets of Tolstoyism and, second, an introduction to Islam.
Of course, Chicherin was also an important opponent of Tolstoyism, which considers the peasant way of life--and peasant culture in general--to be one of the most accomplished forms of human existence.
Between the lines of this piece, Brenner also examined his own Tolstoyism. Like Gordon, he translated a couple of Tolstoy's works: Master and Man (1914) and several chapters from Anna Karenina.
The hero of the film is the writer's secretary, Valentin Bulgakov, who lives for a time at Teliatinki, a settlement where enthusiasts devote themselves to agricultural work and theorists discuss the tenets of Tolstoyism. Vladimir Chertkov, Tolstoy's closest disciple and one of the leaders of the Russian movement, battles with Sophia Tolstoy for control of the writer's legacy, while Tolstoy's personal physician, Dushan Makovitsky, furiously scribbles down everything that Tolstoy has to say.
Still, Addams did not forget her earliest reactions to Tolstoy: She reframed them in the chapter "Tolstoyism," in keeping with her status as the founder of Hull House and internationally known reformer.
More generally, Percy Redfern, a secularist until he turned to the Labour Church, the co-operative movement, and Tolstoyism, spoke for many when he complained that secularism offered only a `negative' liberation when what people need is `truth now, a whole truth, a truth they can live by'.
Kalima, who felt drawn to Tolstoyism, asked Tolstoy how one could gain enough strength to let go of the past and change one's way of life.
Alston names the key adherents to "Tolstoyism" and establishes a social context to explain the worldwide appeal of Tolstoy at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries.
Bartlett devotes about half her book to Tolstoy's career up to the "crisis" of the late 1870s, after which his central focus was no longer as a writer of fiction, but as the founder of a new religion, Tolstoyism ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), a de-mythologized version of Christianity.
In fact, Tolstoyism was a broad movement advocating pacifism, vegetarianism, chastity, sobriety and renunciation of property rights.
Tolstoy really cannot be "assimilated," "tucked away," "contextualized" in any sort of ideology (including "Tolstoyism") or artistic movement (including "realism").