tomato

(redirected from Tomatoe)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

to·ma·to

 (tə-mā′tō, -mä′-)
n. pl. to·ma·toes
1. A widely cultivated plant (Solanum lycopersicum syn. Lycopersicon esculentum)in the nightshade family, having edible, fleshy, usually red fruit. The tomato is native to and was first domesticated in northern South America.
2. The fruit of this plant.

[Alteration of Spanish tomate, from Nahuatl tomatl, fleshy globose fruit, tomatillo, tomato.]

to·ma′to·ey (-tō-ē) adj.

tomato

(təˈmɑːtəʊ)
n, pl -toes
1. (Plants) a solanaceous plant, Lycopersicon (or Lycopersicum) esculentum, of South America, widely cultivated for its red fleshy many-seeded edible fruits
2. (Plants) the fruit of this plant, which has slightly acid-tasting flesh and is eaten in salads, as a vegetable, etc
3. slang US and Canadian a girl or woman
[C17 tomate, from Spanish, from Nahuatl tomatl]

to•ma•to

(təˈmeɪ toʊ, -ˈmɑ-)

n., pl. -toes.
1. a large, mildly acid, pulpy berry, red to red-yellow when ripe, eaten raw or cooked as a vegetable.
2. the plant bearing this berry, Lycopersicon esculentum, of the nightshade family.
3. Older Slang. a girl or woman.
[1595–1605; earlier tomate < Sp < Nahuatl tomatl]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tomato - mildly acid red or yellow pulpy fruit eaten as a vegetabletomato - mildly acid red or yellow pulpy fruit eaten as a vegetable
solanaceous vegetable - any of several fruits of plants of the family Solanaceae; especially of the genera Solanum, Capsicum, and Lycopersicon
beefsteak tomato - any of several large tomatoes with thick flesh
cherry tomato - small red to yellow tomatoes
love apple, Lycopersicon esculentum, tomato plant, tomato - native to South America; widely cultivated in many varieties
2.tomato - native to South Americatomato - native to South America; widely cultivated in many varieties
tomato - mildly acid red or yellow pulpy fruit eaten as a vegetable
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
cherry tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum cerasiforme - plant bearing small red to yellow fruit
Translations
حَبَّة البَنْدورهطَمَاطِمنَبتَة البَنْدورة
rajčerajčatový
tomattomatplante
TomateParadeiserTomatenflanze
tomato
tomaatti
rajčica
paradicsom
tomat
tómatjurttómatur
トマト
토마토
pomidoras
tomāts
paradajkovýparadajkyrajčiak
paradižnik
tomat
nyanya
มะเขือเทศ
cà chua

tomato

[təˈmɑːtəʊ] (US) [təˈmeɪtəʊ]
A. N (tomatoes (pl)) (= fruit) → tomate m, jitomate m (Mex); (= plant) → tomatera f
B. CPD tomato juice Njugo m de tomate
tomato ketchup Nsalsa f de tomate, ketchup m
tomato paste N = tomato purée tomato plant Ntomatera f
tomato purée Npuré m de tomate, concentrado m de tomate
tomato sauce Nsalsa f de tomate (Brit) (in bottle, sachet) = tomato ketchup

tomato

[təˈmɑːtəʊ] [tomatoes] (pl) ntomate ftomato juice njus m de tomatetomato paste nconcentré m de tomate, purée f de tomatetomato purée npurée f de tomatestomato sauce nsauce f tomatetomato soup nsoupe f à la tomate

tomato

[, (US)]
n pl <-es> → Tomate f

tomato

in cpdsTomaten-;
tomato juice
nTomatensaft m
tomato ketchup
n(Tomaten)ket(s)chup m or nt
tomato puree
nTomatenmark nt
tomato sauce
nTomatensoße f; (= ketchup)(Tomaten)ket(s)chup m or nt

tomato

[təˈmɑːtəʊ, ɒm təˈmeɪtəʊ]
1. n (tomatoes (pl)) → pomodoro
2. adj (juice, sauce) → di pomodoro

tomato

(təˈmaːtəu) , ((American) -ˈmei-) nounplural toˈmatoes
1. a type of fleshy, juicy fruit, usually red, used in salads, sauces etc. We had a salad of lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers; (also adjective) tomato sauce.
2. the plant which bears these.

tomato

طَمَاطِم rajče tomat Tomate ντομάτα tomate tomaatti tomate rajčica pomodoro トマト 토마토 tomaat tomat pomidor tomate помидор tomat มะเขือเทศ domates cà chua 番茄

tomato

n. tomate;
___ soupsopa de ___.

tomato

n (pl -toes) tomate m
References in classic literature ?
It was a dinner for a King when he brought in a huge dish of it, succulent with tomatoes, and we ate it together with the good household bread and a bottle of red wine.
Summer squashes almost in their golden blossom; cucumbers, now evincing a tendency to spread away from the main stock, and ramble far and wide; two or three rows of string-beans and as many more that were about to festoon themselves on poles; tomatoes, occupying a site so sheltered and sunny that the plants were already gigantic, and promised an early and abundant harvest.
He held a hoe in his hand, and, while Phoebe was gone in quest of the crumbs, had begun to busy himself with drawing up fresh earth about the roots of the tomatoes.
George suggested meat and fruit pies, cold meat, tomatoes, fruit, and green stuff.
A Boston newspaper reporter went and took a look at the Slave Ship floundering about in that fierce conflagration of reds and yellows, and said it reminded him of a tortoise-shell cat having a fit in a platter of tomatoes. In my then uneducated state, that went home to my non-cultivation, and I thought here is a man with an unobstructed eye.
Carrots and peas, asparagus on toast, the perennial tomatoes and corn and succotash, lima beans, cabbage--and then--
I remember that more than once a can of tomatoes and some crackers constituted a meal.
Wild tomatoes, which had gone to seed or been remorselessly hoed out from the beginning of Berande, were foraged for salads, soups, and sauces.
She worked at all the tasks she had ever done, performing, in fancy, the myriads of mechanical movements peculiar to each occupation--shaping and pasting in the paper box factory, ironing in the laundry, weaving in the jute mill, peeling fruit in the cannery and countless boxes of scalded tomatoes. She attended all her dances and all her picnics over again; went through her school days, recalling the face and name and seat of every schoolmate; endured the gray bleakness of the years in the orphan asylum; revisioned every memory of her mother, every tale; and relived all her life with Billy.
Between these sickly shrubs grew a scanty supply of garlic, tomatoes, and eschalots; while, lone and solitary, like a forgotten sentinel, a tall pine raised its melancholy head in one of the corners of this unattractive spot, and displayed its flexible stem and fan-shaped summit dried and cracked by the fierce heat of the sub-tropical sun.
Butteridge's conception of an adequate equipment for a balloon ascent: a hamper which included a game pie, a Roman pie, a cold fowl, tomatoes, lettuce, ham sandwiches, shrimp sandwiches, a large cake, knives and forks and paper plates, self-heating tins of coffee and cocoa, bread, butter, and marmalade, several carefully packed bottles of champagne, bottles of Perrier water, and a big jar of water for washing, a portfolio, maps, and a compass, a rucksack containing a number of conveniences, including curling-tongs and hair-pins,, a cap with ear-flaps, and so forth.
I extended my search to the Potrero, and by good luck managed to pick up another box of candles, two sacks of wheat flour, ten pounds of graham flour (which would do for the servants), a case of tinned corn, and two cases of tinned tomatoes. It did look as though there was going to be at least a temporary food shortage, and I hugged myself over the goodly stock of provisions I had laid in.