nasal decongestant

(redirected from Topical decongestant)
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Noun1.nasal decongestant - a decongestant that provides temporary relief of nasal symptoms of the common cold and rhinitis and upper respiratory infections
Actifed - trade name for a drug containing an antihistamine and a decongestant; used to treat upper respiratory conditions and minor allergies
decongestant - a drug that decreases pulmonary congestion
Dimetapp - trade name for a drug containing an antihistamine and a decongestant; used to relieve nasal congestion and to treat rhinitis
naphazoline, Privine, Sudafed - vasoconstrictor (trade names Privine and Sudafed) used in nasal sprays to treat symptoms of nasal congestion and in eyedrops to treat eye irritation
References in periodicals archive ?
In preparation, the patient is treated with a topical decongestant such as oxymetazoline, phenylephrine, or epinephrine.
The brand provides topical decongestant relief for adults and gentle saline nasal cleansing for children.
Yet you can usually retrieve a nasal foreign body yourself, if you have several simple instruments (FIGURE 1) and a topical decongestant and anesthetic on hand.
All received 250 mg of cefuroxime twice daily for 10 days along with two puffs of the topical decongestant oxymetazoline in each nostril twice daily for 3 days.
The patient is first administered a topical decongestant.
Topical decongestant when used for short time basis may have a better safety profile than oral agents for 1st trimester.
In all the cases the bleeding was controlled with topical decongestant drops.
During the examination, children must be held and a topical decongestant and anesthetic should be administered.
All of the patients were treated with 250 mg of cefuroxime twice daily for 10 days, as well as two puffs of the topical decongestant oxymetazoline in each nostril twice daily for 3 days.
The patient is first administered topical anesthesia and a topical decongestant (figure).
11] There seems to be no correlation between the severity of rhinitis medicamentosa and the frequency of topical decongestant use.