Toronto Blessing


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Toronto Blessing

n
(Christian Churches, other) the Toronto Blessing a variety of emotional reactions such as laughing, weeping, and fainting, experienced by participants in a form of charismatic Christian worship
[C20: from Toronto, where it originated]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Toronto Blessing also seems omnipresent, being the subject of one chapter and utilized in a variety of others (indeed the length of its entry in the index suggests that it is perhaps the third most important term in the book).
Lighthouse International Church - Owen Hurter, former worship leader at the Toronto Blessing, will lead the worship at 10:30 a.m.
Main Street mystics: The Toronto blessing & reviving pentecostalism.
He touched me; I haven't got words to describe it." The origin of the controversial Toronto Blessing (C.I., Nov.
Taize, Emily Dickinson, ecological spirituality, Toronto Blessing, the Internet, Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Birmingham, even Diana, Princess of Wales all have a mention.
A chapter on the Toronto Blessing follows well-worn literature produced within the "Blessing," and offers little real analysis of what has been awkwardly attached to global Pentecostalism.
On the other; they were tainted with the unforgiveable sin of "enthusiasm", displaying symptoms that we now associate with the Toronto blessing: fainting, groaning and howling.
The five essays touch on concerns of the marginalized, Pentecostal and postmodern hermeneutical developments, women's roles, ecumenism, and the "Toronto Blessing" movement as a symptom of postmodern society.
Robeck, and others), "liberal theology" (David Daniels), feminism (Janet Everts Power), and the Toronto Blessing (Margaret Poloma) .
TACF had previously boosted attendance by staging the notorious "Toronto Blessing" revivals that were marked by "holy laughter." Now new crowds of the curious are flocking to the church, and Arnott says, "God is up to something new." The pastor also told Christianity Today (May 24, 1999) about another nice feature of the dental occurrences: "This is a miracle you don't have to be sick to get."
Margaret Poloma, a sociologist who has studied the Toronto Blessing, regards the unusual physical manifestations associated with the revival to be "`normal' responses to intense emotional reactions that may occur during spiritual, inner, and physical healing." Yet these signs have caused many to question the biblical legitimacy of the revival.
Controversial churchman Dr Andrew Knock, who was criticised for pioneering the Toronto Blessing religious experience in Scotland, has resigned his post after 18 years.
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