torsion bar

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torsion bar

n.
A part of an automotive suspension consisting of a bar that twists to maintain stability.

torsion bar

n
(Mechanical Engineering) a metal bar acting as a torsional spring, esp as used in the suspensions of some motor vehicles

tor′sion bar`


n.
a metal bar having elasticity when subjected to torsion: used as a spring in various machines and in automobile suspensions.
[1945–50]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The ride is firm, with MacPherson Struts in front and a four-link torsion beam in the rear.
When you choose the former you get a simple torsion beam rear suspension, and when you order 4WD your car comes with a more sophisticated multi-link rear axle.
Weighing in at just 2,648 lbs (manual transmission) and 2,714 lbs (automatic transmission), engineers sought to refine the driving experience with more agile handling and improved ride comfort, and this was achieved by designing a fully-independent MacPherson strut front suspension and a torsion beam rear axle.
At the rear is a torsion beam with C cross-section endowing high torsional stiffness.
For the suspension, the Ignis gets McPherson struts at the front and torsion beam setup on the rear.
At the rear, the Type R's H-shaped torsion beam suspension (which caused so much grumbling when the company abandoned a multi-link rear end) is further refined.
The suspension system (MacPherson struts for the front wheels and a torsion beam on the back) provide a softer, stable driving performance.
The suspension is also lighter, with struts up front and a torsion beam rear end combining with a longer wheelbase to better isolate road noise and surface imperfections.
The rear end is suspended by a simple yet space-efficient torsion beam, Honda reasoning that if it could make the feisty Type-R work, and work well, with a torsion beam rear, then there was clearly nothing wrong with the fundamental layout.
The Coupled Torsion Beam Axle rear suspension introduced in 2011 was a smart move, dialling out the understeer its predecessor had, and was also more tunable than the old suspension.
There's nothing revolutionary about the suspension which is fairly standard set-up with MacPherson struts up front and a torsion beam at the rear.