tort

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Related to Torts: Intentional torts

tort

 (tôrt)
n. Law
A wrong that is committed by someone who is legally obligated to provide a certain amount of carefulness in behavior to another and that causes injury to that person, who may seek compensation in a civil suit for damages.

[Middle English, injury, from Old French, from Medieval Latin tortum, from Latin, neuter past participle of torquēre, to twist; see terkw- in Indo-European roots.]

tor′ti·ous adj.

tort

(tɔːt)
n
(Law) law a civil wrong arising from an act or failure to act, independently of any contract, for which an action for personal injury or property damages may be brought
[C14: from Old French, from Medieval Latin tortum, literally: something twisted, from Latin torquēre to twist]

tort

(tɔrt)

n.
Law. a wrongful act resulting in injury to another's person, property, or reputation, for which the injured party is entitled to seek compensation.
[1350–1400; Middle English: injury, wrong < Old French < Medieval Latin tortum wrong, injustice < Latin tortus twisted, crooked, dubious, past participle of torquēre to twist]

tort

A wrongful act, done deliberately or through negligence, especially one that causes injury or damage and for which the injured party may bring a civil suit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tort - (law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be broughttort - (law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be brought
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
alienation of affection - a tort based on willful and malicious interference with the marriage relation by a third party without justification or excuse
invasion of privacy - the wrongful intrusion by individuals or the government into private affairs with which the public has no concern
trespass - a wrongful interference with the possession of property (personal property as well as realty), or the action instituted to recover damages
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

tort

[tɔːt] N (Jur) → agravio m, tuerto m

tort

n (Jur) → Delikt nt
References in classic literature ?
But the whole thickness of some learned counsel's treatise upon Torts did not screen him satisfactorily.
A moment later the regiment roared forth its sudden and valiant re- tort. A dense wall of smoke settled slowly down.
It was in old French, and ran somewhat in this way: Or avant, entre nous tous freres Battons nos charognes bien fort En remembrant la grant misere De Dieu et sa piteuse mort Qui fut pris en la gent amere Et vendus et trais a tort Et bastu sa chair, vierge et dere Au nom de ce battons plus fort.
In art, as in politics, les grandperes ont toujours tort."
to estop as to forestall mine own tort. Wherefore if I would be
Christie and Sanders present a casebook for a two-hour or three-hour tort course for law students who have had a basic torts course and wish to pursue in depth some of the important topics of tort law that are either not covered or not covered in much depth in their basic tort course.
Our empirical analysis considers the timing of four major tort reforms on general torts from 1971 to 2005: caps on punitive damages, limitations on joint and several liability, caps on noneconomic damages, and collateral source rule reforms.
Over the past several decades, the United States has experienced several waves of tort reform.
(19) Second, mass torts play an essential role in vindicating public rights.
The repeated appearance of tort concepts in traffic crimes reveals much about the line between torts and crimes.
Since United Australia, courts have interpreted waiver of tort as either an alternative pleading in unjust enrichment for restitution or as an election of disgorgement over compensatory damages for torts that support both remedies (e.g., conversion or trespass).
In his landmark 1961 article, Some Thoughts on Risk Distribution and the Law of Torts, Judge Calabresi provides a theoretical framework for analyzing tort liability as a risk-spreading device that functions in a manner similar to insurance.