extraordinary rendition

(redirected from Torture flights)

extraordinary rendition

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the process by which a country seizes a person assumed to be involved in terrorist activity and then transports him or her for interrogation to a country where due process of law is unlikely to be respected
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Police have been urged never to give up their battle to obtain secret documents that could prove the full extent of the CIA's use of Scottish airports for "torture flights".
Detectives investigating the use of Scottish airports by CIA torture flights have filed a final report to prosecutors more than five years after the probe began.
But the U.K.'s involvement goes beyond providing a stopover for CIA torture flights. The U.K.'s legal authority, the Crown Prosecution Service, told me that on Dec.
6 HOW can a neutral country like Ireland allow the US to use Shannon Airport as a staging post for its torture flights? Would we give the Russians and Chinese permission to transport their dissidents from abroad via Shannon back to Moscow and Beijing?
On August 31 Ian Cobain and Ben Quinn, writing in the Guardian, revealed that US firms profited from torture flights.
The story becomes one of political intrigue and controversy as the media pursue Lang about his dealings with the CIA and alleged 'torture flights'.
Bisher al-Rawi was arrested in The Gambia in 2002, along with fellow British resident Jamil el-Banna, taken to the Bagram air base in Afghanistan, and subsequently transferred to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on controversial "torture flights".
AN INQUIRY has found no evidence that CIA torture flights landed on British soil, it emerged last night.
BRITAIN did not allow CIA "torture flights" to use its airports to take terror suspects out of Europe, chief police officers have said.
BRITAIN did not allow CIA 'torture flights' to use its airports to take terror suspects out of Europe, chief police officers have said.
Torture flights and bomb belts have debut entries, as does the high-security Green Zone in Baghdad.
Prime Minister Tony Blair and Foreign Secretary Jack Straw are facing tough questions over the use of UK airports to move terror suspects on "torture flights".