Tory

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To·ry

 (tôr′ē)
n. pl. To·ries
1.
a. A member of a British political party, founded in 1689, that was the opposition party to the Whigs and has been known as the Conservative Party since about 1832.
b. A member of a Conservative party, as in Canada.
2. An American who, during the period of the American Revolution, favored the British side. Also called Loyalist.
3. often tory A supporter of traditional political and social institutions against the forces of democratization or reform; a political conservative.

[Irish Gaelic tóraidhe, robber, from Old Irish tóir, pursuit; see ret- in Indo-European roots.]

To′ry adj.
To′ry·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Tory

(ˈtɔːrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member or supporter of the Conservative Party in Great Britain or Canada
2. (Historical Terms) a member of the English political party that opposed the exclusion of James, Duke of York from the royal succession (1679–80). Tory remained the label for subsequent major conservative interests until they gave birth to the Conservative Party in the 1830s
3. (Historical Terms) an American supporter of the British cause; loyalist. Compare Whig
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (sometimes not capital) an ultraconservative or reactionary
5. (Historical Terms) (in the 17th century) an Irish Roman Catholic, esp an outlaw who preyed upon English settlers
adj
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of, characteristic of, or relating to Tories
7. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (sometimes not capital) ultraconservative or reactionary
[C17: from Irish tōraidhe outlaw, from Middle Irish tōir pursuit]
ˈToryish adj
ˈToryism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

To•ry

(ˈtɔr i, ˈtoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries,
adj. n.
1. a member of the Conservative Party in Great Britain or Canada.
2. a member of a British political party formed in the late 17th century, favoring royal authority and opposing reform: succeeded by the Conservative Party about 1832.
3. (often l.c.) an advocate of conservative principles.
4. a person who supported the British cause in the American Revolution; a loyalist.
5. (in the 17th century) one of a class of dispossessed Irish, nominally royalists, who became outlaws.
adj.
6. of, belonging to, or characteristic of the Tories.
7. being a Tory.
8. (often l.c.) conservative.
[1640–50; < Irish *tóraighe outlaw, bandit, derivative of tóir chase, pursuit]
To′ry•ism, n.

-tory1

,
a suffix occurring in loanwords from Latin, orig. adjectival derivatives of agent nouns ending in -tor (predatory); also forming adjectival derivatives directly from verbs (obligatory).
[< Latin -tōrius]

-tory2

,
a suffix occurring in loanwords from Latin, usu. derivatives from agent nouns ending in -tor or directly from verbs, denoting a place or object appropriate for the activity of the verb: dormitory; repository.
[< Latin -tōrium, n. use of neuter of -tōrius -tory1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tory

a loyalist
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tory - an American who favored the British side during the American RevolutionTory - an American who favored the British side during the American Revolution
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
2.Tory - a member of political party in Great Britain that has been known as the Conservative Party since 1832; was the opposition party to the Whigs
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
3.Tory - a supporter of traditional political and social institutions against the forces of reformTory - a supporter of traditional political and social institutions against the forces of reform; a political conservative
rightist, right-winger - a member of a right wing political party
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

Tory

noun
One who strongly favors retention of the existing order:
adjective
Strongly favoring retention of the existing order:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

Tory

[ˈtɔːrɪ] (Brit)
A. ADJconservador
the Tory Partyel Partido Conservador
B. Nconservador(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Tory

[ˈtɔːri]
adj (British) (= Conservative) [government, minister, MP] → tory inv, conservateur/trice
the Tory government → le gouvernement conservateur
n (= Conservative) → tory mf, conservateur/trice m/f
the Tories → les conservateurs
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Tory

(Brit Pol)
nTory m, → Konservative(r) mf
adjkonservativ, Tory-; the Tory governmentdie Tory-Regierung, die konservative Regierung
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Tory

[ˈtɔːrɪ]
1. adjtory inv, conservatore/trice
2. ntory m/f inv, conservatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
There were Tories, Toryish Whigs - like Grenville, Foreign Secretary to Pitt during the French Revolutionary Wars of the 1790s - and liberal Whig supporters of Charles James Fox, lifelong rival and opponent of Pitt, outspoken defender of revolutionaries - American and French alike - but at one with Grenville on slave trade abolition and Catholic civil rights.
He is also an inescapable presence in English journalism, producing with indefatigable regularity articulate, quirkily Toryish columns for various quality papers.