totalitarianism

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to·tal·i·tar·i·an

 (tō-tăl′ĭ-târ′ē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, being, or imposing a form of government in which the political authority exercises absolute and centralized control over all aspects of life, the individual is subordinated to the state, and opposing political and cultural expression is suppressed: "A totalitarian regime crushes all autonomous institutions in its drive to seize the human soul" (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).
n.
A practitioner or supporter of such a government.


to·tal′i·tar′i·an·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

totalitarianism

1. a system of highly centralized government in which one political party or group takes control and grants neither recognition nor tolerance to other political groups.
2. autocracy in one of its several varieties.
3. the character or traits of an autocratic or authoritarian individual, party, government, or state. — totalitarian, n., adj.
See also: Government
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

totalitarianism

A form of government in which the state controls every aspect of the individual’s life and all opposition is suppressed.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.totalitarianism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)totalitarianism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
2.totalitarianism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in governmenttotalitarianism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in government
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

totalitarianism

noun
1. Absolute power, especially when exercised unjustly or cruelly:
2. A political doctrine advocating the principle of absolute rule:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
totalitarizam
totalitarianismo

totalitarianism

[ˌtəʊtælɪˈtɛərɪənɪzəm] Ntotalitarismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

totalitarianism

[təʊˌtælɪˈtɛəriənɪzəm] ntotalitarisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

totalitarianism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

totalitarianism

[ˌtəʊtælɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzm] ntotalitarismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
[6.] Chioveanu, Mihai (2006), "Antifascism si totalitarism", in Rubel, Alexander; Turliuc, Catalin (Hrsg.), Totalitarism.
(65) Stephane Courtois, Communism si Totalitarism, Translated by Anca Ciucan Tutuianu from the French original Communisme et Totalitarisme, (Paris: Perrin, 2009); (Iasi: Polirom, 2011).
(34.) However, authors such as Albert Camus, a few years later, would use the discourse of Mediterranean identity to identify features of resistance to totalitarism. See Albert Camus' "La nouvelle culture mediterraneenne" (The New Mediterranean Culture).
The two-page agreement which avoided any reference to the armed struggle further stresses that the parties want to secure the rights of the Sudanese people for freedom from totalitarism, violence, and poverty, and to move towards a well-established democracy, a just peace and balanced development".