trade acceptance

(redirected from Trade Bills)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial.

trade acceptance

n.
A bill of exchange drawn directly upon and accepted by an importer or purchaser, rather than a bank, and due at a specified future time.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trade′ accept`ance


n.
a bill of exchange drawn by the seller of goods on the buyer, and accepted by the buyer for payment at a future date.
[1915–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trade acceptance - a bill of exchange for a specific purchasetrade acceptance - a bill of exchange for a specific purchase; drawn on the buyer by the seller and bearing the buyer's acceptance
bill of exchange, draft, order of payment - a document ordering the payment of money; drawn by one person or bank on another
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This bill will allow Barack Obama and his successors the ability to "fast track" trade bills, sending them directly to Congress for an up-or-down vote.
Senate Democrats, including Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, insisted that fast-track authority be bundled together with three other trade bills, including one that would impose import duties on countries that manipulate their currencies for unfair trade advantage.
However, given the limited number of working days this month, however, the Senate might not be able to take up the trade bills in the next couple of weeks.
Obama urged Congress to pass stalled trade bills and said he wants unemployment benefits extended.
The branch can now handle the renminbi-denominated trade bills of Indian exporters and importers.
Graham has previously said that the current cap and trade bills in the House and Senate are "going nowhere" and are not business-friendly enough and do not lead to meaningful energy independence.