trading post

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trading post

n.
A station or store in a sparsely settled area established by traders to barter supplies for local products.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trading post

n
1. (Commerce) a general store established by a trader in an unsettled or thinly populated region
2. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange a booth or location on an exchange floor at which a particular security is traded
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trad′ing post`


n.
a general store established in a remote area, orig. by a trading company to obtain furs, etc., in exchange for food, clothing, and other supplies.
[1790–1800, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trading post - a retail store serving a sparsely populated regiontrading post - a retail store serving a sparsely populated region; usually stocked with a wide variety of merchandise
mercantile establishment, outlet, retail store, sales outlet - a place of business for retailing goods
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

trading post

nstazione f commerciale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The fair, a grand horological event, was organised by India's leading watch and clock magazine "Trade Post" under the auspices of Watch Trade Federation and supported by other trade bodies.
Furs, it becomes clear, were not the sole focus of the HBC's trade post employees, and Company concerns were not only with pelt profits but also with a public image tied to altruism and Age of Enlightenment high-thinking.