Tradescant


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Tradescant

(ˈtrædɛskaent)
n
1. (Biography) John. 1570–1638, English botanist and gardener to Charles I. He introduced many plants from overseas into Britain
2. (Biography) his son, John. 1608–62, English naturalist and gardener, who continued his father's work
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Noun1.Tradescant - English botanist who was one of the first to collect specimens of plants (1570-1638)
References in periodicals archive ?
It honours John Tradescant, an English horticulturist who, along with his son (also called John), introduced many new plants to England.
A horn from a Cheshire woman's head, one of the English naturalist, gardener and collector John Tradescant's lost rarities, is exhibited here in replica; an entire hall is dedicated to Athanasius Kircher, the 17th-century polymath whose own Wunderkammer in Rome ranked among Europe's most celebrated.
It later died a natural death, giving John Tradescant the Elder, whose family founded Oxford museums, an opportunity to add the specimen into his collection.
likens the exhibit to John Tradescant's "Cabinet of Curiosities" at Oxford's Ashmolean Museum.
In my book The Cyprus Orchard, I included a quote from John Tradescant, the great plant hunter, which reads -- 'Even a King new come to his Kingdom cannot hunt deer and eat fruit in the same month.
An inquest into his death heard that he was spotted leaping over fences from one garden to another after he clambered out of the window on to the roof of his home in Tradescant Road, south Lambeth, in October 2013.
A couple, John and Rosemary Nicholson, traced the tomb of two royal gardeners and plant hunters, John Tradescant and his son, at the back of the church, which inspired the couple to convert the church into the first museum dedicated to the history of gardening.
Recent tours of Luxury Homes featured estate-style homes represented by Leslie Young (2509 Sharon View, Wakefield, Raleigh and 1225 Keith Rd., Hasentree, Wake Forest); Kimberly Conroy (1200 Ladowick, Hasentree, Wake Forest and 1508 Tradescant Court, Raleigh); Kathy Beacham, (7713 Serenity Lake Dr., Serenity Lake, Wake Forest), and Linda Craft (106 Baybrook Ct., Baybrook, Cary and 9109 Fawn Hill Ct., Brier Creek, Raleigh).
In another example, which shows how these cabinets of curiosity move to museum status and finally to set the stage for the modern museums we have today, we see the collection of John Tradescant, which contained a vast collection of items from all over the world.
Linnaeus named spiderworts for other prominent botanists, the Tradescants. Naturalist and plant collector John Tradescant I, often referred to as the ''father of English gardening,'' was head gardener to King Charles I.
Both novels tell fantastical tales of imperialist travels; colonial contact with the Other; the (re)discovery and appropriation of exotic plants, fruits, and other various commodities; and the politics of horticultural and corporeal grafting, which is defined in Sexing the Cherry as the coming together of two distinct parts "so that the two take advantage of each other and produce a third kind, without seed or parent." (12) In Sexing the Cherry Jordon, the adopted son of Dog Woman and one of the protagonists of the seventeenth-century narrative, encounters explorer and "Gardener to the King," John Tradescant, and begins his own experimentations in grafting.
Designed by John Tradescant, Alan is keen on it because it showcases the ideas of the 17th century in one place.