tragedy

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Related to Tragic drama: Tragic theatre

trag·e·dy

(trăj′ĭ-dē)
n. pl. trag·e·dies
1.
a. A drama or literary work in which the main character is brought to ruin or suffers extreme sorrow, especially as a consequence of a tragic flaw, moral weakness, or inability to cope with unfavorable circumstances.
b. The genre made up of such works.
c. The art or theory of writing or producing these works.
2. A play, film, television program, or other narrative work that portrays or depicts calamitous events and has an unhappy but meaningful ending.
3. A disastrous event, especially one involving distressing loss or injury to life: an expedition that ended in tragedy, with all hands lost at sea.
4. A tragic aspect or element.

[Middle English tragedie, from Old French, from Latin tragoedia, from Greek tragōidiā : tragos, goat; see tragic + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots and (Greek tragedy probably being so called because it developed from a ritual or festival procession involving a goat as the sacrifice or the prize for the composition of a song, or perhaps because festival participants wore animal masks and skins, including those of goats).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tragedy

(ˈtrædʒɪdɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Theatre) (esp in classical and Renaissance drama) a play in which the protagonist, usually a man of importance and outstanding personal qualities, falls to disaster through the combination of a personal failing and circumstances with which he cannot deal
2. (Theatre) (in later drama, such as that of Ibsen) a play in which the protagonist is overcome by a combination of social and psychological circumstances
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any dramatic or literary composition dealing with serious or sombre themes and ending with disaster
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in medieval literature) a literary work in which a great person falls from prosperity to disaster, often through no fault of his own
5. (Theatre) the branch of drama dealing with such themes
6. the unfortunate aspect of something
7. a shocking or sad event; disaster
[C14: from Old French tragédie, from Latin tragoedia, from Greek tragōidia, from tragos goat + ōidē song; perhaps a reference to the goat-satyrs of Peloponnesian plays]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trag•e•dy

(ˈtrædʒ ɪ di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. a lamentable, dreadful, or fatal event or affair; calamity; disaster: a family tragedy.
2. the tragic element of drama, of literature generally, or of life: the tragedy of poverty.
3. a literary composition, as a novel, dealing with a somber theme carried to a tragic conclusion.
4. a dramatic composition, often in verse, dealing with a serious or somber theme, typically that of a great person destined through a flaw of character or conflict with some overpowering force, as fate or society, to suffer downfall or destruction.
5. the branch of the drama that is concerned with this form of composition.
6. the art and theory of writing and producing tragedies.
[1325–75; Middle English tragedie < Medieval Latin tragēdia, Latin tragoedia < Greek tragōidía=trág(os) goat + ōidḗ song (see ode) + -ia -y3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tragedy

A serious drama where the protagonist is overcome by social or psychological circumstances or personal failure.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tragedy - an event resulting in great loss and misfortunetragedy - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
misfortune, bad luck - unnecessary and unforeseen trouble resulting from an unfortunate event
act of God, force majeure, inevitable accident, unavoidable casualty, vis major - a natural and unavoidable catastrophe that interrupts the expected course of events; "he discovered that his house was not insured against acts of God"
apocalypse - a cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of evil
famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
kiss of death - something that is ruinous; "if this were known it would be the kiss of death for my political career"
meltdown - a disaster comparable to a nuclear meltdown; "there is little likelihood of a meltdown comparable to the American banking collapse in March 1933"
plague - any large scale calamity (especially when thought to be sent by God)
visitation - any disaster or catastrophe; "a visitation of the plague"
tidal wave - an unusual (and often destructive) rise of water along the seashore caused by a storm or a combination of wind and high tide
tsunami - a cataclysm resulting from a destructive sea wave caused by an earthquake or volcanic eruption; "a colossal tsunami destroyed the Minoan civilization in minutes"
2.tragedy - drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or circumstancetragedy - drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or circumstance; excites terror or pity
drama - the literary genre of works intended for the theater
tragicomedy - a dramatic composition involving elements of both tragedy and comedy usually with the tragic predominating
comedy - light and humorous drama with a happy ending
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tragedy

noun
1. disaster, catastrophe, misfortune, adversity, calamity, affliction, whammy (informal, chiefly U.S.), bummer (slang), grievous blow They have suffered an enormous personal tragedy.
disaster success, fortune, joy, happiness, prosperity
2. tragic drama, play a classic Greek tragedy
Quotations
"Tragedy is clean, it is restful, it is flawless" [Jean Anouilh Antigone]
"Tragedy ought to be a great kick at misery" [D.H. Lawrence letter]
"All tragedies are finish'd by a death,"
"All comedies are ended by a marriage" [Lord Byron Don Juan]
"The world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel" [Horace Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford Letters]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

tragedy

noun
An occurrence inflicting widespread destruction and distress:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حادِث مأساوي، مأساهمَأْساةمأساة، رِوايَةٌ مأساوِيَّه
tragédie
tragedie
tragediamurhenäytelmä
tragedija
tragédiadrámaszomorújáték
harmleikursorgaratburîur
悲惨な出来事
비극
tragedijatragiškas
traģēdija
tragédia
tragedija
tragedi
โศกนาฏกรรม
trajediağlatıfacia
tấn thảm kịch

tragedy

[ˈtrædʒɪdɪ] N (gen) (Theat) → tragedia f
it is a tragedy thates una tragedia que ...
the tragedy of it is thatlo trágico del asunto es que ...
a personal tragedyuna tragedia personal
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tragedy

[ˈtrædʒədi] n
(= tragic event) → tragédie f
(= play) → tragédie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tragedy

n (= tragic incident)Tragödie f; (Theat also) → Trauerspiel nt; (no pl: = tragicness) → Tragische(s) nt; he often acts in tragedyer tritt oft in Tragödien auf; six killed in bus crash tragedytragischer Busunfall forderte sechs Todesopfer; the tragedy of it is that …das Tragische daran ist, dass …; it is a tragedy that …es ist (wirklich) tragisch or ein Unglück, dass …
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tragedy

[ˈtrædʒɪdɪ] n (gen) (Theatre) → tragedia
it is a tragedy that ... → è una vera disgrazia che...
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tragedy

(ˈtrӕdʒədi) plural ˈtragedies noun
1. (a) drama about unfortunate events with a sad outcome. `Hamlet' is one of Shakespeare's tragedies.
2. an unfortunate or sad event. His early death was a great tragedy for his family.
ˈtragic adjective
1. sad; unfortunate. I heard of the tragic death of her son.
2. of tragedy or tragedies. a tragic hero.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

tragedy

مَأْساة tragédie tragedie Tragödie τραγωδία tragedia tragedia tragédie tragedija tragedia 悲惨な出来事 비극 tragedie tragedie tragedia tragédia трагедия tragedi โศกนาฏกรรม trajedi tấn thảm kịch 悲剧
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
There's little doubt young Harvey Maxtone owes his life to the skill of the medical team at Dr Gray's - and the fact Moray's flagship hospital was on his parents' doorstep when a potentially tragic drama began to unfold.
Tanya Pollard's book, with its appealing focus on the heroines of Greek tragic drama, promises to do just that.
But the best comparison would be 2011's tragic drama "We Need to Talk About Kevin," starring Tilda Swinton as a guilt-and-grief-stricken mother whose son grows up to become a sociopathic mass murderer despite years of pouring her unwavering maternal love and support into his empty human vessel.
THE tragic drama of the sinking of the Titanic will be brought to life in a unique and highly original immersive theatre experience next month, to coincide with the 107th anniversary of the ship's fatal voyage.
If we say these are not my friends or families or they don't even belong to my social class and choose to watch the tragic drama without acting, we will be poorer for it in spirit.'
They are members of a family looking for an author to finish their tragic drama. They include the father, the mother, a veiled woman who looks like she has been abducted from the seraglio, two children, and a stepdaughter in a revealing gown.
Richard Strauss' opera, which manages to combine backstage tensions, lowlife comedy and high tragic drama, is complex in its textures and structures, but in a presentation such as this it emerges as a convincing, life-enhancing jewel.
This time, it is not going to be a tragic drama, the genre which she has chosen herself after her comeback, but an entertaining Eid show titled Kaun Bane Ga Chichorpati, apparently a parody of the popular gameshow Kaun Bane Ga Crorepati.
Ruy Blas, first performed in 1838, is a tragic drama by Victor Hugo, while Gil Blas of Santillana is an early 18th Century novel by Alain-Rene Lesage.
Identifying the prophetic witness of Haggai and Zechariah as an intrusion into this pattern, she proposes a literary-rhetorical solution that also sets these chapters solidly in the Greek period: following Aristotle's rules of tragic drama (ca.