trainband

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train·band

 (trān′bănd′)
n.
A company of trained militia in England or America from the 16th to the 18th century.

[Contraction of trained band.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

trainband

(ˈtreɪnˌbænd)
n
(Historical Terms) a company of English militia from the 16th to the 18th century
[C17: altered from trained band]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

train•band

(ˈtreɪnˌbænd)

n.
a company of English militia in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries.
[1620–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trainband - a company of militia in England or America from the 16th century to the 18th centurytrainband - a company of militia in England or America from the 16th century to the 18th century
company - small military unit; usually two or three platoons
militia, reserves - civilians trained as soldiers but not part of the regular army
trainbandsman - a member of a trainband
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He tracked down the first-known published appearance of OK with its current meaning in the Boston Morning Post on March 23, 1839: "The 'Chairman of the Committee on Charity Lecture Bells' is one of the deputation, and perhaps if he should return to Boston, via Providence, he of the Journal, and his train-band, would have the 'contribution box,' et ceteras, o.k.--all correct--and cause the corks to fly, like sparks, upward."