transsexual

(redirected from Transexuality)
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Related to Transexuality: transsexuality, Transgenderism

trans·sex·u·al

(trăns-sĕk′sho͞o-əl)
adj.
Relating to or being a person who has undergone medical treatment to change their body to match their gender identity.
n. Often Offensive
A person who is transsexual. See Usage Note at transgender.

transsexual

(trænzˈsɛksjʊəl) or

transexual

n
1. (Psychiatry) a person who permanently acts the part of and completely identifies with the opposite sex
2. (Surgery) a person who has undergone medical and surgical procedures to alter external sexual characteristics to those of the opposite sex

trans•sex•u•al

(trænsˈsɛk ʃu əl)

n.
1. a person who strongly desires to assume the physical characteristics and gender role of the opposite sex.
2. a person who has undergone surgical and hormonal treatment for this purpose.
adj.
3. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of transsexuals.
[1955–60; trans- + sexual, orig. in transsexualism (1953)]
trans•sex′u•al•ism, trans•sex`u•al′i•ty, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transsexual - a person who has undergone a sex change operation
unusual person, anomaly - a person who is unusual
2.transsexual - a person whose sexual identification is entirely with the opposite sex
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.transsexual - overwhelmingly desirous of being, or completely identifying with, the opposite sex
Translations

transsexual

[trænzˈseksjʊəl]
A. ADJtransexual
B. Ntransexual mf

transsexual

[ˌtrænˈsɛkʃuəl]
adjtranssexuel(le)
ntranssexuel(le) m/f

transsexual

nTranssexuelle(r) mf

transsexual

[trænzˈsɛksjʊəl] n & adjtransessuale (m/f) inv

trans·sex·u·al

a. transexual.
1. persona que tiene una urgencia psicológica de pertenecer al sexo opuesto;
2. persona que ha cambiado de sexo sometiéndose a una operación quirúgica.

transsexual

adj & n transexual mf
References in periodicals archive ?
"Maybe this will mean that there will be less judgement from strangers in the future, just as homosexuality and transexuality have become more accepted in society as people have been more aware of them."
I worry about the tendency to make separate fields out of men's studies, women's studies, queer studies, sexuality studies, transexuality studies.
Such is the argument that underpins the examination of gender labels and identities in Lola Robles' essay, "Transmonstruxs: transexualidad, transgernerismo y androginia en la literatura fantastica" (Transmonsters: Transexuality, Transgenderism and Androgyny in Fantastic Literature).
(54.) Joanne Meyeorowitz, HOW SEX CHANGES: A HISTORY OF TRANSEXUALITY IN THE UNITED STATES 259 (Harvard University Press 2002).
"Doing Justice to Someone: Sex Reassignment and Allegories of Transexuality," GLQ 7,4 (2004): 621; Hick, Social Work in Canada.
MOVING FORWARD: FROM TRANSEXUALITY TO TRANS SEXUALITIES
(5) In several countries, restrictions have been imposed on the freedoms of expression and association of sexual minorities, (6) while in others, homosexuality and transexuality are perceived as Western phenomena, (7) anti-revolutionary behaviours, (8) crimes against religion, (9) sexually deviant and immoral behaviours, (10) mental disorders (11) or unacceptable challenges to gender-specific roles.
(11) We know, for example, that John Herbert was dressing in drag in Toronto in the 1940s, which he talks about in his unpublished memoir, "Writing in the Sand," interred at the University of Waterloo Archives, and that he and early drag queen Alan Maloney toured across Canada as female impersonators in a burlesque review called "Paris After Midnight." Although her study looks at the history of transvestism and transexuality in performance from the 1950s through the 1980s, Vivian Namaste notes evidence of transsexual performance in Montreal in the 1930s (C'etait du spectacle!
Those writings about transexuality are similarly varied in their characterization of the phenomenon."); Sandy Stone, The Empire Strikes Back: A Posttranssexual Manifesto, in BODY GUARDS: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF GENDER AMBIGUITY 280, 296 (Julia Epstein & Kristina Straub eds., 199i) ("To foreground the practices of inscription and reading which are part of this deliberate invocation of dissonance, I suggest constituting transsexuals not as a class or problematic 'third gender,' but rather as a genre--a set of embodied texts whose potential for productive disruption of structured sexualities and spectra of desire has yet to be explored."); Vade, supra note 183, at 260 ("[S]ome male-to-female transgender people are butch lesbians.