trans fat

(redirected from Transfatty acid)
Also found in: Medical.

trans fat

 (trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.
Translations
Transfettsäure

trans fat

(fam) trans fatty acid. V. fatty acid.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In your diet, fat should account for less than 2035 percent, saturated fatty acid less than 10 percent, and transfatty acid less than 3 percent.
8 Journal of the American Medical Association, involved participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study and looked at transfatty acid blood levels before and after a federal regulation required manufacturers to list levels of the acids on product labels.
Additionally, Sunbutter contains no hydrogenated oil and 0 percent transfatty acid, while providing 68 percent of the minimum daily requirement of Vitamin E, 49 percent of thiamin, and 8 percent of iron.
In soap making one takes a transfatty acid or triglyceride (oil or kitchen grease), blends it with a solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH or lye) and water.
medicine and physiology: acid reflux, ADHD, mad cow disease, transfatty acid, body mass index
Baked and fried foods, packaged snacks and meat constitute major source of transfatty acids (TFA) which are clearly atherogenic, raising LDL-C, TG and Lipoprotein a [Lp (a)], lowering HDL-C, increasing TC/HDL-C ratio and Apo B/Apo A1 ratio, promoting inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, adiposity, insulin resistance and arrhythmia.
A study -- conducted jointly by National Diabetes, Obesity and Cholesterol ( N- DOC) Foundation, IIT- Delhi and Diabetes Foundation of India ( DFI) -- has revealed that re- use of oil in home- cooked food forms heavy dose of transfatty acids ( TFA).
Hydrogenated oils have transfatty acids added to prolong shelf life, and are found in margarine and many baked goods.
5] For the purpose of this article, the acronym TFA refers to artificially or industrially produced transfatty acids.
Figure 1 illustrates the chemical structures of saturated fat, cisunsaturated fatty acids, and transfatty acids (Norris, 2007).
If you have significant numbers of these factors present, in the presence of cigarette smoke, mercury, lead, transfatty acids, insulin, homocysteine, or radiation, the potential for arterial damage increases.