transfiguration

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trans·fig·u·ra·tion

 (trăns-fĭg′yə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. A marked change in form or appearance; a metamorphosis.
b. A change that glorifies or exalts.
2. Transfiguration
a. Bible The sudden emanation of radiance from the person of Jesus that occurred on a mountain.
b. The Christian feast commemorating this event, observed on August 6 in the Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Orthodox churches and on the Sunday before Lent in most Protestant churches.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transfiguration

(ˌtrænsfɪɡjʊˈreɪʃən)
n
the act or an instance of transfiguring or the state of being transfigured

Transfiguration

(ˌtrænsfɪɡjʊˈreɪʃən)
n
1. (Bible) New Testament the change in the appearance of Christ that took place before three disciples (Matthew 17:1–9)
2. (Theology) the Church festival held in commemoration of this on Aug 6
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trans•fig•u•ra•tion

(ˌtræns fɪg yəˈreɪ ʃən, trænsˌfɪg-)

n.
1. the act of transfiguring.
2. the state of being transfigured.
3. (cap.) the supernatural and glorified change in the appearance of Jesus on the mountain. Matt. 17:1–9.
4. (cap.) the church festival commemorating this, observed on August 6.
[1325–75; < Latin trānsfigūrātiō change of shape. See transfigure, -ation]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transfiguration - (Christianity) a church festival held in commemoration of the Transfiguration of JesusTransfiguration - (Christianity) a church festival held in commemoration of the Transfiguration of Jesus
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
Christian holy day - a religious holiday for Christians
2.transfiguration - (New Testament) the sudden emanation of radiance from the person of JesusTransfiguration - (New Testament) the sudden emanation of radiance from the person of Jesus
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible
miracle - a marvellous event manifesting a supernatural act of a divine agent
3.transfiguration - a striking change in appearance or character or circumstances; "the metamorphosis of the old house into something new and exciting"
revision, alteration - the act of revising or altering (involving reconsideration and modification); "it would require a drastic revision of his opinion"
4.transfiguration - the act of transforming so as to exalt or glorifytransfiguration - the act of transforming so as to exalt or glorify
translation, transformation - the act of changing in form or shape or appearance; "a photograph is a translation of a scene onto a two-dimensional surface"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

transfiguration

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
Transfiguration

transfiguration

[ˌtrænsfɪgəˈreɪʃən] Ntransfiguración f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

transfiguration

n
Verklärtheit f; (= transformation)Wandel m, → Wandlung f
(Rel) TransfigurationVerklärung fJesu, Transfiguration f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

transfiguration

[ˌtrænsfɪgəˈreɪʃn] n (liter) (Rel) → trasfigurazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"The mighty heaven," said Proclus, "exhibits, in its transfigurations, clear images of the splendor of intellectual perceptions; being moved in conjunction with the unapparent periods of intellectual natures." Therefore science always goes abreast with the just elevation of the man, keeping step with religion and metaphysics; or the state of science is an index of our self-knowledge.
It was a sudden transfiguration, a lifting-up of day.
I think I shall never remember any thing I saw there distinctly but the mummies, and the Transfiguration, by Raphael, and some other things it is not necessary to mention now.
The Transfiguration, by Raphael, is an eminent example of this peculiar merit.
We have learned to think of women in a sort of symbolic transfiguration, based on clothes; and one of the readiest ways in which we conceive our mistress is as a composite thing, principally petticoats.
For the brief space that it lasted, it was a dark transfiguration. But his character had been so much enfeebled by suffering, that even its lower energies were incapable of more than a temporary struggle.
It was less a reform than a transfiguration. The former curves of sensuousness were now modulated to lines of devotional passion.
Master of mysteries and lord of law, high-pinnacled upon the throne of thought, his face suffused with the dim splendors of the Transfiguration, his legs intertwisted and his tongue a-cheek, the editor spills his will along the paper and cuts it off in lengths to suit.
(deep, as has been noticed, and swallowing up head, shoulders, and elbows) came forth again mellow-faced, and seeming to have undergone a saccharine transfiguration.
Now, the history of Eliza Doolittle, though called a romance because of the transfiguration it records seems exceedingly improbable, is common enough.
Newman had never seen the marquis so exhilarated; his pale, unlighted countenance had a sort of thin transfiguration. He held open the door for some one else to enter, and presently appeared old Madame de Bellegarde, leaning on the arm of a gentleman whom Newman had not seen before.
When it passed Miss Tita was there still, but the transfiguration was over and she had changed back to a plain, dingy, elderly person.