transhumanism

(redirected from Transhumanistic)
Also found in: Medical.

trans·hu·man·ism

 (trăns-hyo͞o′mə-nĭz′əm, trănz-)
n.
1. A belief that humans should strive to transcend the physical limitations of the mind and body by technological means.
2. A movement of people who espouse such a belief.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"transhumanistic" and was then changed to "transpersonal
Generally, discussions concerning transhumanistic anthropology and the posthuman condition regularly reference phrases such as "they are not here yet." Anthropologically speaking, the posthuman condition does not have to be regarded as a quantum leap from the current human condition towards a super-human condition; neither does it need to be considered a blazing apparition in the sky of planetary consciousness.
Neural networks in transhumanistic meditation: In 1920, in his book
Maybe, but we can get a feeling of what this transhumanistic idea would be like by letting a bulletproof matrix of spidersilk merge with an in vitro human skin," she added.
So how does one connect transhumanistic viewpoints, the habit of consuming micronutrients and implementing other life extension strategies?
The main reason I'm writing is that, in the course of our conversations, we thought of using the word "transpersonal" instead of the clumsier word "transhumanistic" or "transhuman." The more I think of it, the more this word says what we are all trying to say, that is, beyond individuality, beyond development of the individual person into something that is more inclusive than the individual person or which is bigger than he is.
18) Then, Abraham Maslow, a pioneer in the field, predicted a Fourth Force, called "transhumanistic." This area of study recognizes the entire range of human experience, including the spiritual and other non-ordinary states of consciousness.