transition point


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transition point

n
1. (General Physics) the point at which a transition of physical properties takes place, such as the point at which laminar flow changes to turbulent flow
2. (General Physics) See transition temperature
References in periodicals archive ?
At a temperature 100 degrees cooler than the glass transition point, such deformations healed in three weeks.
For the period from the maximum to the transition point, the sine curve used is sometimes treated as a the second quadrant of the same sine curve used for the period up to the maximum (Parton and Logan 1981; Goudriaan and van Laar 1994), although others have preferred a separate sine curve with a different phase length for this section (Cesaraccio et al.
Z], then t is a transition point [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [B.
Having such assumptions the forecasting of a transition point for a new product represented by a time series d' [not member of] D, will start with finding an implication between historical datasets D and P, f: D [right arrow] P; followed by application of the model found to new data.
At the second transition point, at Breadalbane Academy in Aberfeldy, I dumped my beloved Kuota Karma bike and slipped on my Asics running shoes.
We see July, 2011 as an important transition point, but remember that we have both a military and a civilian component to our strategy.
It is clear that the ductile-brittle transition point is found to occur in the range between 10[degrees]C and 0[degrees]C for the blends Fa, F0, and F1.
It just means that that will be a transition point where we will begin to pull some of our forces back and turn over some of the responsibilities to the Afghan themselves," Jones said at the Washington-based Foreign Press Center.
At the glass transition point, roughly half of the molecules are in the solid state, and crystalline clusters make a fractal pattern.
Washington, Apr 2 (ANI): A new study from University of Cambridge has provided new evidence that the human brain lives "on the edge of chaos", at a critical transition point between randomness and order.

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