trapper

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trap·per

 (trăp′ər)
n.
One who traps animals for their fur.

trapper

(ˈtræpə)
n
(Hunting) a person who traps animals, esp for their furs or skins

trap•per

(ˈtræp ər)

n.
a person or thing that traps, esp. a person who traps animals for their furs.
[1615–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trapper - someone who sets traps for animals (usually to obtain their furs)trapper - someone who sets traps for animals (usually to obtain their furs)
coureur de bois - a French Canadian trapper
hunter, huntsman - someone who hunts game
Translations
صَيّاد الحَيوانات لِبَيْع جِلْدِها
lovec zvěře
pelsjæger
csapdaállító prémvadász
veiîimaîur
lovec zveri

trapper

[ˈtræpəʳ] Ntrampero m, cazador m

trapper

[ˈtræpər] ntrappeur m

trapper

nFallensteller(in) m(f), → Trapper(in) m(f)

trapper

[ˈtræpəʳ] ncacciatore m di animali da pelliccia

trap

(trӕp) noun
1. a device for catching animals. He set a trap to catch the bear; a mousetrap.
2. a plan or trick for taking a person by surprise. She led him into a trap; He fell straight into the trap.
verbpast tense, past participle trapped
to catch in a trap or by a trick. He lives by trapping animals and selling their fur; She trapped him into admitting that he liked her.
ˈtrapper noun
a person who traps animals and sells their fur.
ˈtrap-door noun
a small door, or opening, in a floor or ceiling. A trap-door in the ceiling led to the attic.
References in classic literature ?
State of the fur trade of the Rocky Mountains American enterprises General Ashley and his associates Sublette, a famous leader Yearly rendezvous among the mountains Stratagems and dangers of the trade Bands of trappers Indian banditti Crows and Blackfeet Mountaineers Traders of the Far West Character and habits of the trapper
They removed their emporium from Astoria to Fort Vancouver, a strong post on the left bank of the Columbia River, about sixty miles from its mouth; whence they furnished their interior posts, and sent forth their brigades of trappers.
1822, and in the following year pushed a resolute band of trappers across the mountains to the banks of the Green River or Colorado of the West, often known by the Indian name of the Seeds-ke-dee Agie.
They had to be continually on the alert, too, against the mountain tribes, who beset every defile, laid ambuscades in their path, or attacked them in their night encampments; so that, of the hardy bands of trappers that first entered into these regions, three-fifths are said to have fallen by the hands of savage foes.
Trappers generally go in pairs, that they may assist, protect, and comfort each other in their lonely and perilous occupations.
The trappers had not long departed, when two Snake Indians wandered into the camp.
As he would have to leave his horses and their accoutrements here, he determined to make this a trading post, where the trappers and hunters, to be distributed about the country, might repair; and where the traders might touch on their way through the mountains to and from the establishment at the mouth of the Columbia.
It is in this way that small knots of trappers and hunters are distributed about the wilderness by the fur companies, and like cranes and bitterns, haunt its solitary streams.
Though the trapper manifested some surprise when he perceived that another human figure was approaching him, and that, too, from a direction opposite to the place where the emigrant had made his encampment, it was with the steadiness of one long accustomed to scenes of danger.
The trapper earnestly regarded her anxious and frightened features, and then he dropped the butt of his rifle on the ground, like one whose purpose had undergone a sudden change.
The trapper had not time to express the surprise he felt at this incoherent and contradictory language, for the man who was advancing, was, already, within fifty feet of the place where they stood.
But still I say we are safe with this honest trapper.