Trappist

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Related to Trappists: Cistercian

Trap·pist

 (trăp′ĭst)
n.
A member of the main branch of Cistercian monks, characterized by austerity and a commitment to silence, established in 1664 at La Trappe Monastery in northwest France.

Trap′pist adj.

Trappist

(ˈtræpɪst)
n
(Roman Catholic Church)
a. a member of a branch of the Cistercian order of Christian monks, the Reformed Cistercians of the Strict Observance which originated at La Trappe in France in 1664. They are noted for their rule of silence
b. (as modifier): a Trappist monk.

Trap•pist

(ˈtræp ɪst)

n.
1. a member of a branch of the Cistercian order, observing the austere reformed rule established at the abbey of La Trappe in France in 1664.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to the Trappists.
[1805–15; < French trappiste, after the name of the monastery]

Trappist

a member of a Roman Catholic monastic order, a branch of the Cistercians, observing an austere, reformed rule, including a vow of silence. — Trappist, adj.
See also: Monks and Nuns
a member of a Roman Catholic monastic order, a branch of the Cistercians, observing an austere, reformed rule, including a vow of silence; named after the monastery at La Trappe, France, where the reformed rule was introduced in 1664. — Trappist, adj.
See also: Catholicism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Trappist - member of an order of monks noted for austerity and a vow of silenceTrappist - member of an order of monks noted for austerity and a vow of silence
monastic, monk - a male religious living in a cloister and devoting himself to contemplation and prayer and work
Translations

Trappist

[ˈtræpɪst]
A. ADJtrapense
B. Ntrapense m
C. CPD Trappist monk Nmonje m trapense

Trappist

n (also Trappist monk)Trappist m

Trappist

[ˈtræpɪst]
1. adjtrappista m
2. ntrappista m
References in classic literature ?
Turn Chartreux or Trappist, and relate your secrets, but, as for me, I do not like any one who is alarmed by such phantasms, and I do not choose that my servants should be afraid to walk in the garden of an evening.
The Cistercian monks, also known as Trappists, make up around half of the 40-strong population on the isle.
A year as a hermit outside the walls with the Trappists at Spencer, Mass.
Lovely people, the Trappists - they do a lot of great work for charity but don't like to talk about it.
The last living link to the earliest history of the Trappists in North America, Father Laurence's formative years were cultivated by monastic elders who had lived and prayed in the original 1825 foundation of Petit Clairvaux in Tracadie, Nova Scotia.
The Trappists are the most renowned of the brewing monks.
In 1999, the Bavaria brewery took a role in operations, but in 2005, the monks again reasserted themselves, and now Trappists are once again involved in daily operations.
DISTANT CORNERS Dr Michael Cawood Green won the Olive Schreiner Prize for his novel, For the Sake of Silence, about Austrian Trappists in South Africa
In addition to vows of poverty, chastity and obedience taken by all religious, Trappists bind themselves to silence and stability--the latter vow requiring them to remain in one monastery for life.
For 65 years, Hugh served his brother Trappists in every way possible: as a lowly novice and seminarian, as a priest and confessor, as a teacher and prior, as a retreat master, and as abbot of the community.
When he first heard about Trappists, he wrote 'What wonderful happiness there was, then, in the world
Of less renown are the ales of Wallonia's other Trappist breweries, Orval and Rochefort, the latter's being the most rare of the Wallonian Trappists.