Trasimene


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Trasimene

(ˈtræzɪˌmiːn)
n
(Placename) Lake Trasimene a lake in central Italy, in Umbria: the largest lake in central Italy; scene of Hannibal's victory over the Romans in 217 bc. Area: 128 sq km (49 sq miles). Also known as: Lake Perugia Italian name: Lago Trasimeno
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the idea that the defeat of Servilius' cavalry in a skirmish after the Battle of Lake Trasimene (June 217 BC) left the way open to Rome stretches credibility.
As an experienced general, he was elected to the dictatorship in 217 after disastrous Roman defeats at the hands of Hannibal at the Trebia and Lake Trasimene, and when he set off in command of the army his strategy represented something quite new and unprecedented for the Romans.
Car il arriva a l'un et a l'autre d'apprendre que leurs enseignes militaires ne pouvaient ni s'arracher du sol, ni meme bouger, le premier avant la bataille de Trasimene contre Hannibal, le second avant la bataille de Carrhes contre les Parthes en 53 av.
The early works are shown with pictures by other Perugians of the time: the refined Madonna and Child with Saints from Frankfurt, generally and presumably correctly attributed to Fiorenzo di Lorenzo; Bonfigli's small Thyssen Annundation with its prospect of the towers of Perugia and Trasimene in the distance; the great caporali gonfalone from Montone, with its view of that town and its breached walls; the Pietro di Gaieotto gonfalone, which is stylistically compatible with the scene above Sante's own two Bernardino panels; and the competent yet lugubrious altarpiece by the Master of the Gardner Annunciation from Terni.
Twenty-four June 217 BC: As the early rays of dawn crested the steep hills surrounding the crystal blue waters of Lake Trasimene, Roman proconsul Caius Flaminius pulled his heavy cloak closer about his shoulders.
Hannibal's clashes at the major battles of the Trebia, Lake Trasimene and Cannae are memorably rendered.
not Trebia, not Trasimene, not Cannae with its entombing of the Roman
Hannibal's triumph at Cannae was not as perilous for Rome as Agnadello was for Venice; nor were Roman losses at the battles of the Trebia and Lake Trasimene as devastating as Brescia and La Motta were for the Republic.
Would we know the real St Francis if we doubted that he spoke to the fish in Lake Trasimene or that the wolf of Gobbia came to hold out his paw to him?
Without being a `phoney war' of Macchiavellian intrigue, only one Sienese nobleman was a casualty: Giovanni Maria Buoninsegni, who was captured by the Pontificals on the shore of Lake Trasimene.