Travailous

Trav´ail`ous


a.1.Causing travail; laborious.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
I ran it through, even from my boyish days, To th' very moment that he bade me tell it, Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents by flood and field, Of hair-breadth scapes I'th' imminent deadly breach, Of being taken by the insolent foe And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence And portance in my travailous history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks and hills whose heads touch heaven It was my hint to speak--such was the process-And of the cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
I ran it through, even from my boyish days To th'very moment that he bade me tell it; Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents by flood and field; Of hair-breadth scapes i'th'imminent deadly breach; Of being taken by the insolent foe And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence, And portance in my travailous history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak--such was my process-- And of the cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
traveilous (OED) 14th century variant of travailous, laborious
Like Antony, Othello has seen wonders far and wide, and travel is the story of his life, but it is a "travailous history" that wins him Desdemona's love: "She loved me for the dangers I had passed / And I loved her that she did pity them." (15) In Richard II, Shakespeare uses the word's two meanings to pull apart the romance of aristocratic travel.