Treblinka


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Treblinka

(trɛˈblɪŋkə)
n
(Placename) a Nazi concentration camp in central Poland, on the Bug River northeast of Warsaw: chiefly remembered as the place where the Jews of the Warsaw ghetto were put to death
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Caroline Sturdy Colls, a British professor and forensic archaeologist perhaps best known for her 2014 documentary on Treblinka, explores the island in a documentary called "Adolf Island" airing June 23 on the Smithsonian Channel.
Hristo Lukov, a Nazi ally who sent 11,300 Jews to the Nazi death camp of Treblinka in Poland.
They were forced into a ghetto, then sent to Theresienstadt, and then to Treblinka, where they were murdered on 5 Oct 1942.
Poland's Jews -- who made up 10 percent of Poland's population -- were mostly killed in other death camps, including Treblinka, Belzec and Sobibor, Blatman said.
Korczak accompanied 200 Jewish children to the train for Treblinka. Ultimately, no one survived.
We also hear how Morris lost his entire family to the gas chambers of Treblinka.
His Jewish mum and sisters were murdered in the Treblinka death camp in 1942.
The March of Remembrance began at Umschlagplatz Memorial, the site where forces of Nazi Germany occupying Poland started in July 1942 putting Jews on trains to the Treblinka death camp.
Everyone who has seen the 9 1/2 hours of Shoah will remember the scene in which an old SS Unterscharfuhrer at Treblinka named Franz Suchomel, who does not know that he is on camera, agrees to recount his history at the camp and says, "But don't use my name." Lanzmann replies, "No, I promised.
But on July 22, 1942, the deportations to the concentration camp Treblinka began, and Ringelblum hastily ordered the researchers to turn in everything they had in hand.
This volume also includes his reminiscences of his childhood in Alexandria and Cairo, drawing in bittersweet nostalgia a picture of a bygone era in Egypt, while in the background loom what would become milestone events in his adopted countries in subsequent decades: the Treblinka trials and the gains of the National Democratic Party in Germany and the rise of the Labour Party in Britain.
To do otherwise is just being blind to the "eternal Treblinka."