tree nut


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tree nut

n.
Any of various edible dried fruits or seeds of nonleguminous woody plants. Tree nuts include almonds, walnuts, cashews, pine nuts, and sometimes coconuts, but not peanuts, soybeans, or sunflower seeds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, previous research by the same researchers showed that although tree nut consumption in the U.
1 US prevalence of self-reported peanut, tree nut, and sesame allergy: 11-year follow-up.
The researchers examined the diets of more than 13,000 adults participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and found that tree nut consumption was associated with a lower prevalence rate of four risk factors for metabolic syndrome-abdominal obesity, hypertension (high blood pressure), low HDL-C (good cholesterol) and elevated fasting glucose-as well as a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome in general, as compared to non-nut consumers.
pecans entering India is much higher than that of other tree nuts 36 percent, compared to 10 percent for pistachios and almonds.
BSACI guideline for the diagnosis and management of peanut and tree nut allergy.
A study published in Nutrition Journal (June 28, 2015) compared risk factors for heart disease and metabolic syndrome between tree nut consumers and those who did not eat tree nuts.
Researchers found that of the 8,205 mothers included in the initial cohort, 140 of their children developed a peanut or tree nut allergy.
It is worth noting that this latest paper was partly funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation, although it took no part in the study.
Children with milk allergy outgrew their allergy 41% of the time, 40% for egg, 36% for soy, 31% for wheat, 27% for sesame seed, 25% for fish, 16% for peanut, 14% for tree nut, and13% for shellfish allergy.
It's worthwhile to provide some education about what a tree nut is, what a peanut is, and what they all look like," suggests pediatrician Todd Hostetler, lead author of the study.
As school health and nutrition professionals come to identify more and more students with peanut and tree nut allegories, the goal of keeping schools allergen-free and safe for all students becomes more important.
Tree nut oils generally contain high percentage of monounsaturated fatty acid predominantly oleic acid and low percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids.