Tridacna gigas


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Related to Tridacna gigas: Tridacna squamosa
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Noun1.Tridacna gigas - a large clam inhabiting reefs in the southern Pacific and weighing up to 500 poundsTridacna gigas - a large clam inhabiting reefs in the southern Pacific and weighing up to 500 pounds
clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
genus Tridacna, Tridacna - type genus of the family Tridacnidae: giant clams
References in periodicals archive ?
Creencia of WPU College of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences said, 'Tridacna gigas [giant clams] is hard to propagate because the population is few.
Giant clams or the Hippopus and Tridacna gigas species are believed to play a wide range of ecological roles in coral reef ecosystems, according to then Bohol CRM coordinator Adelfa Salutan.
Multiple species of giant clams (Tridacna squamosa, Tridacna gigas, and Hippopus hippopus) begin to acquire symbionts within 3-10 days post-fertilization when provided with Symbiodinium upon hatching, but some individuals delay symbiont acquisition (Fitt and Trench, 1981; Fitt et al., 1984; Norton et al., 1992; Mies et al., 2012).
Comparison of different hatchery and nursery culture methods for the giant clam Tridacna gigas. In: Copland, J.
Today's giant clamshells, Tridacna Gigas, are heavily protected.
These are debris from making clam-shell Tridacna gigas artefacts.
Gene flow among giant clam (Tridacna gigas) populations in the Pacific does not parallel ocean circulation.
The largest species, Tridacna gigas, grows over a period of several decades to nearly 5 feet in length, with a shell that can weigh more than 400 pounds.
Tridacna gigas, more commonly known in the Philippines as Taklobo, is the largest living immobile bivalve mollusk in the world and also one of the most endangered species with a survival rate of .01 percent.
'Tridacna gigas are hard to propagate because the population is few.
The study, funded by the National Parks Board of Singapore, found that the worlds largest giant clam species, Tridacna gigas, is the most threatened mollusc.