perphenazine

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Related to Trilafon: Haldol, Sparine

per·phen·a·zine

 (pər-fĕn′ə-zēn′)
n.
A crystalline compound, C21H26ClN3OS, used as a tranquilizer especially in the treatment of psychosis and to prevent or alleviate nausea and vomiting.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

perphenazine

(pəˈfɛnəˌziːn)
n
(Pharmacology) pharmacol a potent antipsychotic drug with formula C21H26ClN3OS, used to treat psychoses such as schizophrenia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

per•phen•a•zine

(pərˈfɛn əˌzin, -zɪn)

n.
a crystalline, water-insoluble powder, C21H26ClN3OS, used as a tranquilizer and in treating intractable hiccups and nausea.
[1955–60; per- + phen (othi) azine]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perphenazine - tranquilizer and antidepressant (trade name Triavil) sometimes used as an antiemetic for adults
antianxiety drug, anxiolytic, anxiolytic drug, minor tranquilizer, minor tranquilliser, minor tranquillizer - a tranquilizer used to relieve anxiety and reduce tension and irritability
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

perphenazine

n perfenazina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril), methotrimeprazine (Nozinan), olanzapine (Zyprexa), perphenazine (Trilafon), pimozide (Orap), quetiapine (Seroquel), thioridazine (Mellaril), and trifluoperazine (Stelazine).
Se suministro trifluoperazina (Stelazine) en 13 casos, trifluopromazina (Siquil) en 11, prorclormazina (Stemetil) en 11, levomeprazina (Sinogan) en 8, flufenacina (Anatensol, Prolixin) en 3 y reserpina (Serpasil) en 2; entre otros individuales como perfemazina (Trilafon), tioperazina (Mayeptil), periciazina (Neuleptil), acepromazina maleato (Plegicil).
Examples of older "typical" antipsychotic medications include chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), perphenazine (Trilafon) and fluphenazine (Prolixin).
Antipsychotic Medications, Generic and Brand Names and Typical Tablet Dosage Generic Name Brand Name Tablet dosage range Atypical Risperidone Risperdal 1-3 mg Olanzapine Zyprexa 2.5-10 mg Clozapine Clozaril 25-100 mg Quetiapine Seroquel 25-200 mg Ziprasidone Geodon 20-60 mg Aripiprazole Abilify 5-15 mg High Potency Haloperidol Haldol 0.5-20 mg Typical Pimozide Orap 2 mg Fluphenazine Prolixin 2.5-10 mg Medium Potency Trifluoperazine Stelazine 1-10 mg Typical Perphenazine Trilafon 2-16 mg Thiothixene Navane 2-20 mg Loxapine Loxitane 5-50 mg Low Potency Molindone Moban 5-100 mg Typical Mesoridazine Serentil 10-100 mg Thioridazine Mellaril 10-200 mg Chlorpromazine Thorazine 10-200 mg Adapted from Wilens (1999) and Li, Pearrow, & Jimerson (2010).
Reynolds in 1989 to emphasize that smoking helped him control his moods and emotions, despite what he acknowledged were "unpleasant side effects." (20) A Seattle man wrote in 1987 that he found that smoking helped mitigate the effects of the Trilafon (a medication for psychosis) he was taking.
Drug Milligram equivalent to 20 Confidence mg of olanzapine (Zyprexa) Second generation antipsychotics Aripirazole (Abilify) 30 M Clozapine (Clozaril) 400 H Paliperidone (Invega) 9 M Quetiapine (Seroquel) 740 H Risperidone (Risperdal) 6 H First generation antipsychotics Haloperidol (Haldol) 10 H Perphenazine (Trilafon) 30 M Trifluoperazine (Stelazine) 20 M Key: H = high confidence level; M = moderate confidence level.
The most damaging blow to the atypicals was an authoritative 2005 study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health--the so-called CATIE study--which found that the atypical antipsychotics worked no better than a much older antipsychotic called Trilafon (perphenazine), which was developed in the 1950s.