Triptolemus


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Triptolemus

(trɪpˈtɒlɪməs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a favourite of Demeter, sent by her to teach mankind agriculture
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Further, the insignificance of Triptolemus and Eumolpus point to considerable antiquity, and the digamma is still active.
If indeed when the pilgrim arrives in the world below, he is delivered from the professors of justice in this world, and finds the true judges who are said to give judgment there, Minos and Rhadamanthus and Aeacus and Triptolemus, and other sons of God who were righteous in their own life, that pilgrimage will be worth making.
We may compare the much smaller votaries depicted on the Triptolemus relief (Fig.
Legend has it that Demeter gave Celeus' sick son, Triptolemus, poppies to drink in warm milk to make him sleep (Ovid, Fasti, 4, 481483).
Greco-Roman mythology of the third century AD also included stories of Triptolemus and his support for animal welfare.
The collection was famous because it contained stones from the 16th-century court of the Gonzagas in Mantua with some illustrious provenances--these included Pope Paul II (a red-brown agate intaglio of Ulysses and Diomedes by Felix), Lorenzo de' Medici (a cameo of Demeter and Triptolemus; Fig.
After a section on the foods and drinks of the ancient diet (17-30), the chapter closes with mythological and poetic accounts of food for sustenance and healing as a civilising force in human development: the Golden Age, Prometheus, Heracles, Demeter, Persephone and Triptolemus, and Dionysus (30-38).
Contact: Triptolemus Institute of Sustainable Living, Rich and Aimee Douglass, 112 Pulp Mill Rd., Chateaugay, NY 12920; 518-497-3249, 7-9 p.m.
Like the Homeric Hymn, Ovid's account describes both the universal catastrophe brought forth on the earth due to Ceres' grief, and the eventual restoration of Proserpina to her mother, which establishes the cycle of the seasons.(7) In his Fasti, Ovid retells the story in order to explain particular conventions in the rituals of Ceres' worship, adding to this version the story of Ceres' nursing of the infant Triptolemus, as she nursed Demophoon in the Homeric Hymn.(8)