Troas


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Tro·as

 (trō′ăs′) also Tro·ad (-ăd′)
An ancient region of northwest Asia Minor surrounding the city of Troy. It formed the setting for the events recounted in the Iliad.

Troas

(ˈtrəʊæs)
n
(Placename) the region of NW Asia Minor surrounding the ancient city of Troy. Also called: the Troad
References in periodicals archive ?
The columns are made from granite from quarries in Troas in Turkey and reflect commercial activities involving building materials during the Roman period.
Many of his journeys in the first century were to Anatolian cities including Ephesus, Konya, Troas, Miletus and Colossae.
Terence Spencer observes that "a considerable number of Shakespeare's contemporaries had visited Troy (at least, they visited what were supposed to be the ruins of Homer's Troy; they were really standing on St Paul's Alexandra Troas .
5) It would exceed the scope of this article to attempt this task with regard to all the translations; and therefore I shall confine myself to the work of Jasper Heywood, the author of three translations: Troas, Thyestes and Hercules Furens.
Luke first joined Paul's company then, at Troas at about the year 51, and accompanied him into Macedonia and eventually to Philippi.
She is preferred to the unexposed Troas, who is possibly open to a bit more improvement.
Parion is among the important cities of Ancient Troas and was first excavated in 2005.
VICTORY AT A CANTER Troas ridden by Fran Berry goes on to win the Join The Tote Go Racing Club Maiden at Leopardstown yesterday
E hoje um lugar na Troas desolada resplende eternamente aos peregrinos, eterno pela Ninfa (29) que de Jupiter (30) foi esposa e que deu a vida a Dardano, (31) que ergueu Troia, de onde provem Assaraco, (32) os talamos e o reino dos Romanos.
9) Led by the poet and classicist Jasper Hayward, whose Troas (1559), Thyestes (1560), and Hercules Furens (1561) provided the impetus, university students translated Seneca's extant drama throughout the rest of the 1560s; their individual editions were published almost immediately as single volumes, before being collected by Thomas Newton in Seneca His Tenne Tragedies (1581).
The University Orders for Elizabeth's 1564 visit specify that Cambridge was "to provide Hercules furens, Troas, or some Princely Tragedy" (my emphasis): Alan H.